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Fall 2013 Topics

America in the World, the World in AmericaAmerican Studies; Film Studies; Transnationalism
Monika Siebert
CRN: 15570 and 15572

Narratives of Globalization in Literature and Film.:  How do the contemporary storytellers, fiction writers and filmmakers alike, meet the challenge of representing America on the global canvas? Through what specifically literary and cinematographic techniques do they narrate the historic and contemporary ways in which American experience has been and continues to be intertwined with the world? In a careful study of selected novels and films by American and international authors, we will consider the effects of the increasingly transnational perspectives in contemporary literature and film on our understanding of the United States and its relationship to the rest of the world.

Associate Professor of English
Contemporary American Literature
American Indian Literature and Film
Asian American Literature
American GodsReligion; Popular Culture; History
Douglas Winiarski
CRN: 15634 and 15635

An obscure man in New York City’s dingiest neighborhood is reborn as an Old Testament prophet. An immigrant Jewish peddler struggles to practice his faith in Yankee New England. An enslaved African American receives visions of a bloody Christ that ignite an insurrection. Early America was awash in a sea of gods both old and new. In this seminar, we will explore the alternative religions that flourished in nineteenth-century America, then turn to the study of religion in contemporary popular culture. The course concludes with an extended journey through Neil Gaiman’s award-winning science fiction novel, American Gods.

Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies
Religion in early America
Native American religions
Religion and popular/material culture
Are they Amazons? Categories of Women in Renaissance ItalyGender;History;Social Issues
Christine Contrada
CRN: 15594

Since Joan Kelly posed her question "did women have a Renaissance?" historians have spent the last few decades carefully considering the place of women in Renaissance society rather than continuing to exclude them to the periphery of the historical narrative. Based on studies of social and cultural norms categories of women have emerged. They are saints, sinners, humanists, mothers, daughters, wives, and even, when they have leadership positions or were active philosophers, unnatural Amazons. This course will explore these labels in a historical context to place their experiences more clearly into the larger history of their age.

Barcelona, Modern and ContemporaryLiterature; Visual culture; Architecture
Sharon Feldman
CRN: 15576 and 15577
This seminar will look at how the city of Barcelona is portrayed in literature and other works of art. Our focus will be the cultural and intellectual history of this Catalan city from the mid nineteenth century to the present day. We shall explore the perpetual transformations, expansions, and urban projects that have been carried out by architects, designers, and urban planners, as well as politicians, and we shall see how these projects have invaded the imagination of artists, intellectuals, writers, playwrights, and filmmakers.
Professor of Spanish and Catalan Studies
William Judson Gaines Chair in Modern Foreign Languages
Interim Chair, Department of Theatre and Dance
Spanish and Catalan theatre and performance
Theatre translation and translation theory
Baseball in Film and LiteratureFilm; Baseball; Literature

Robert Kenzer
CRN: 13443

This seminar explores how baseball has been portrayed in American film and literature through four mediums: documentary, feature film, fiction, and non-fiction.  The course will encourage four mediums: documentary, feature film, fiction, and non-fiction.  The course will encourage students to think about the ways these mediums reveal how baseball has embodied critical aspects of American society including race and ethnicity, urbanization and suburbanization, business, labor-management relations, and media.  While all the levels of baseball will be touched on, the primary focus will be Major League Baseball.

Professor of History and American Studies
William Binford Vest Chair of History
19th Century United States
Civil War Era
Capitalism and Its DiscontentsHistory; Society; Justice
Eric Yellin
CRN: 15296
This course will consider how philosophers, novelists, social reformers, economists, and ordinary people have understood, promoted, opposed, and sought to reform capitalism since the eighteenth century. Focused on the history of the United States, the course will encourage students to think about the social and political implications of capitalist and anti-capitalist ideologies. Readings will examine inequality, work, gender roles, and class and racial hierarchies in the past and today. Authors include Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Franklin Roosevelt, Milton Friedman, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Thomas Piketty.
Associate Professor of History and American Studies
Modern United States
U.S. Political and Social History
African American History
Changing International Consumer Culture in a Digital WorldMarketing; International
Dana Lascu
CRN: 15418 and 15419

What does it mean to be part of a global consumer culture? This course will undertake a socio-culturally inspired analyses of consumption, addressing global consumer culture from mutliple perspectives -- marketing (primarily), economics, communication, gender studies, anthropology, history, and sociology.  We will examine the impact of globalization on consumers from low- and medium-income countries, and their consumption as a consequence of and in tandem with consumption patterns and rituals in high-income countries. Among others, the course will engage in a critical analysis of global consumerism based on readings from industry and from popular culture sources.

Professor of Marketing
Marketing Research
International Marketing
Civic Journalism & Social JusticeJournalism; Social Justice
Tom Mullen
CRN: 15422

This course will explore the various ways that journalism has functioned as an instrument of social justice through identification and publication of issues that include poverty, racism, war, health, religion, education and other related topics.  Students will study case histories in which journalists have brought public attention to important social concerns and the ways in which those concerns were resolved to bring about more just communities.  Research includes identifying contemporary issues of concern and applying basic journalism training to create awareness of specific social situations.  This fall, students will take part in a journalism department project to help produce work related to the Library of Congress Veterans History Project.

Director of Public Affairs Journalism
Conservation, Foreign Policy and DevelopmentBiology; Conservation; International
Peter Smallwood
CRN: 15339

Many developed countries are very concerned about the rapid, accelerating loss of the earth's biodiversity. In developed countries, there are many government programs and non-government organizations (NGOs) dedicated to conserving biodiversity, and these programs are most often focused on the developing world. Conservation projects often have economic development objectives intertwined with their conservation objectives, partly as a strategy to attract funding, especially in countries with active conflicts.  This seminar will examine conservation programs from an interdisciplinary approach; from the basic science of conservation, to the economics of conservation, and the ways in which foreign policy objectives interact with conservation objectives.

Associate Professor of Biology
Ecology
Science Policy
Conservation Biology
Environmental Studies
Contemplative Traditions in ArtArt; Religion; Literature
Mark Rhodes
CRN: 15601

This course will examine the visual art, poetry and music connected to or inspired by three important and influential world contemplative religious traditions.  Though there are, at some levels, enormous differences between Zen, Sufism and Mystical Christianity, there are also surprising similarities in the aims, methods, approaches, and most importantly, the language used by great practitioners of these traditions.  We will study a selection of primary texts, and since these texts explore religion at an esoteric level, they are very challenging. We will also devote a limited amount of time reading from scriptures, including Buddhist Sutras, The Old and New Testaments, and the Quran.

Cops, Crime, and Pop CultureMedia & Communication; Crime; Popular Culture
Nicole Maurantonio
CRN: 15584 and 15774

This course will examine popular representations of police and crime within a variety of genres, from reality TV to news. Through a critical analysis of primary source materials collected through independent research, students will engage with fundamental questions of media representation as they relate to issues of race, class, and gender.

Associate Professor
Chair, Department of Rhetoric & Communication Studies
Program Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Studies
Public memory
U.S. media history
Race and representation
Qualitative research methods
Crime, Justice and the LawCrime; Punishment; Justice
Richard Dagger
CRN: 15442
Our students grow up surrounded by crime. Even those from the safest neighborhoods have been exposed to crime in what they read (from comic books to mystery novels), what they watch (in movies, television shows, and the news), and in what they play (videogames). There are conceptual and ethical questions about crime, however, that they are likely not to have considered. What, for example, is a crime - or what should count as one - and how do crimes differ from other wrongful acts? Is everyone who commits a crime a criminal? Or would we do better to treat crimes as diseases that require therapy rather than punishment? These and related questions will be the subject of this seminar.
E. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Chair in the Liberal Arts
Chair, Department of Political Science
Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law (PPEL)
Political and legal philosophy, with special interests in republicanism, political obligation, and the justification of punishment
Crime & Punishment : Russian Fiction & FilmLiterature; Russia; English
David Brandenberger
CRN: 15637

"Crime and Punishment in Russian Fiction and Film" examines the acts of transgression and retribution, two long-standing preoccupations of the Russion intelligentsia. This course specifically investigates how writers, artists and cinematographers have depicted the changing boundaries of propriety and criminality since the early 19th century. An interdisciplinary course, it includes with its historically-informed framework not only short stories and novels, but also poetry, opera and cinema. Important shifts in expression and representation are identified during the emergence of imperial Russian civil society; the 1917 revolution; the Stalin period; later Soviet stagnation; and after the collapsse of Communism in 1991.

Professor of History and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Politics and Diplomacy, Modern Europe
Imperial Russia / Soviet Union / Post-Soviet space
Ideology & Propaganda
Nationalism
Interdisciplinary methodology (esp. concerning literature and film)
Darwin's Theory, Then and NowBiology; Science; Culture
Gary Radice
CRN: 15341
Darwin's On the Origin of Species is arguably one of a few books whose publications changed culture. Surprisingly, few have read the book and understand what Darwin said and did not say about how species evolve. This course will examine the historical and biographical context for Darwin's book, and then fast forward to how Darwin's ideas are viewed today by biologists after 150 years of advances in genetics, biogeography, paleontology, embryology, and genomic analysis.
Democracy and EducationEducation; Politics; Philosophy
Nathan Snaza
CRN: 15571

This course will investigate the historical, social, political, and philosophical contexts of American schools and debates about school reform.  Through readings, discussions, volunteer work in Richmond Public  Schools, autobiographical essays, and an individual research project, students will explore the complicated - even contradictory - relations between schooling and democratic life in the U.S.  Readings will begin with essays by "Founding Fathers" Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Rush and conclude with a unit on how the OCCUPY movement (especially in NYC and Chicago) intersected with grassroots activism by parents, students and teachers to resist the increasing corporatization of public schools.

Director, Bridge to Success Program
Modern Narrative, primarily British and American
Literary Theory and Continental Philosophy
Posthumanism
Social and Cultural Foundations of Education, Critical Pedagogy, Literacy Studies
Sexuality and Gender Studies
Entrepreneurship and Innovation as Drivers of Economic GrowthEconomics; Capitalism; Entrepreneurship
Porcher Taylor
CRN: 15592

“Entrepreneurial capitalism” is a form of capitalism where entrepreneurs, who continue to provide breakthrough ideas that meet the test of the marketplace, play a central role in the system. This capitalist system is punctuated by large numbers of the actors within the economy who not only have an “unceasing drive and incentive to innovate” but also undertake and commercialize revolutionary innovations and inventions. Is entrepreneurial capitalism “a new view of the wealth of nations” and an innovation pathway to global growth during this jobless recovery? This seminar will explore how entrepreneurial capitalism can advance both economic growth and national security.

Program Chair, Paralegal Studies
Professor, Paralegal Studies
Associate Professor of Management
Paralegal studies
Epidemics & EmpiresBiology; History; Society
Lisa Summers
CRN: 15297 and 15299

Smallpox, malaria, yellow fever, lungsickness and other maladies were central to imperial conquests, colonialism, and modernization. And recent globalization has pulled attention back to problems from cholera to polio and HIV/AIDS. Using varied case studies, this seminar asks how have such illnesses--epidemic, endemic, epizootic and pandemic--mattered during the years of imperial conquest and globalization? Why do they happen and what do they mean? How are they social and cultural diseases? How did people re-make themselves and their societies to cope with the challenges they posed then and pose now?

Samuel Chiles Mitchell-Jacob Billikopf Professor of History and International Studies
Chair, Department of History
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Africa and World Politics and Diplomacy
Colonial Africa
History of Education
Nationalism and Decolonization
Ethics and the Banality of EvilEthics; Evil; Military
Lionel Mew
CRN: 15593

This course uses lectures, discussions and research to examine scenarios where unspeakable acts by seemingly ordinary people become routine and accepted. The effects of these acts, where ordinary people perform evil actions on individuals and society are discussed in detail. The effects on perpetrators, victims, observers and society at large are considered. Questions of whether these instigators are evil, whether they become evil when associated with evil leaders and groups, or feel that they are innocents who disassociate themselves from evil are examined. Cases include military scenarios throughout history.

Program Chair, Information Systems
Assistant Professor, Information Systems
Member, SPCS Speakers Bureau
Information Systems Operations & Development
IT Security
IT Auditing
Cloud Computing
Films of the 1940's: Paranoia, Patriotism or PropagandaFilm; History; Narrative
Walter Schoen
CRN:15305
The students will be asked to "read" films as cultural reflections of the times in which they are created.  This "reading" will include anlaysis of narrative as well as cinamagraphic techniques used in the creation of movies.  The course will be driven by the question, "Can a popular medium such as film be a primary source for understanding history?"
Associate Professor of Theatre
Acting
Directing
Shakespeare
Theatre in Russia
Framing the US ConstitutionLaw; Legal History
John Pagan
CRN:15807
This course provides an examination of the making of the United States Constitution, focusing on the political ideas that led to the creation of the American republic; the Constitutional Convention of 1787; the ratification debates, and the adoption of the Bill of Rights. Through our readings and discussion, we will undertake a critical examination of the lofty ideals and pragmatic compromises that produced the framework of American government.
Global Medicine and HealingMedicine; International; Health
Jennifer Nourse
CRN: 15304

This is a seminar in medical anthropology. The seminar examines how people in cultures from around the world regard and heal illness. While Western biomedicine is acknowledged throughout the world as effective, in some cases, people turn to traditional or ethnomedical cures. How people articulate their selections in these medically plural environments raises a host of questions we will explore throughout the semester: How do people discuss their illnesses? Do they use metaphors ("I'm fighting a cold")? What is their process of healing? Our readings will conclude with consideration of healing efficacy, spiritual healing and pharmaceutical testing of herbal curing.

Associate Professor of Anthropology
Islamic Medicine
Traditional Medicine and Biomedicine in Southeast Asia and Beyond
Mothering, Midwifery and Ethnic Identity in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Political Autonomy and Ethnic Identity in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Green SchoolsGeography; Environment; Renewable Energy
Mary Finley-Brook
CRN: 15540

Seminar participants will learn to identify patterns and processes of greening in institutions of higher education while developing research, writing and presentation skills. This campus sustainability seminar is divided into three parts. At the start of the semester, we will learn to analyze the foundations of environmental sustainability and each student will define their own notion of "ecological intelligence." The second part examines green/renewable energy and campus sustainability. Library research from this second part will inform individual and samll group research in the final part of the class. Students will develop a unique on-campus research project while having the support of a team of peer researchers and a faculty mentor.

Watching the Detectives: Crime in Fiction and FilmLiterature; Film; American
Abigail Cheever
CRN: 15575
The hard-boiled novel produced some of the twentieth century's most famous movies, spawning a new visual style (film noir) and establishing the gangster and detective film as among the medium's most celebrated genres. This seminar pairs novels such as Hammett's The Maltese Falcon, Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice, and Chandler's The Big Sleep, among others, with their subsequent film adaptations and homages to enable an in-depth consideration of the genre of the crime and detective story and concept of film adaptation. Students will read, watch, analyze and research 1) the formal properties that define detective novels and films 2) the literary and film traditions, historical circumstances, and cultural contexts from which these genres emerged, and 3) the differences that emerge when literary texts are translated into the predominantly visual medium of narrative fiction film.
Associate Professor of English
Post World War II American novels and films
Contemporary American literature and culture
Hollywood Film
Hearing Cinema: Music in Hollywood FilmFilm; Music; Cinema
Jeffrey Riehl
CRN: 15650

Through the study of eight Hollywood films, this course examines how music in film narration creates a point of experience for the spectator. Students consider what music is doing in the movies in the first place, and then how it does what it does. Students also examine what and how music signifies in conjunction with the images and events of a story film. By sensitizing students to the fore-and background levels of musical meaning in film, they will begin to hear cinema's uses of music in order to read films in a more literate way.

Associate Professor of Music, Director of University Choirs
Chair, Department of Music
Chair, Department of Music
Choral music of Slovenia
Sacred works of W.A.Mozart
Music and Religion
Choral and Vocal Pedagogy
How the Brain Creates GodPsychology
Craig Kinsley
CRN: 15636

This course will examine the evidence - evolutionary, social, neurobiological - for the presence of god, religious experience, and religion in the life and development of the human. We will cover the entire history of advanced life, and discuss how religion, early and present, shaped the human and its societies. One question: did god create man or did the brain create god?

Knowing and Choosing in the Face of Adversity and UncertainitySelf; Interdisciplinary; Literature
Mavis Brown
CRN: 15585

There are many lenses through which to analyze the human experience. In this reading-intensive course of challenging texts, we will examine knowing on the one hand, and various ways of choosing in the face uncertainty and adversity on the other, as these concepts play out in selected classic texts. In the second part of the semester, we will examine the ways in which contemporary individuals seek to fashion happy and fulfilling lives, as we shift our focus to a 21st century situation of adversity that demands change.

Associate Professor of Education
Educational policy and school reform
21st century framework for learning
Child and adolescent development/diverse learners
Weaving children's literature into the curriculum
Global awareness: cultural and educational perspectives
Modern American Human Rights Lawyers: Leadership and Community ServiceLaw; Leadership; Community Service
Jonathan Stubbs
CRN: 15658

Many lawyers become  leaders and serve in roles  ranging   from heads of local civic and religious institutions, to President of the United States.  This course explores the relationship between the law and leadership.  It will challenge students to refine what leadership means to them in theory as well as provide practical experiences for reflection. The specific focal point for such thought and writing will be roles that lawyers have played in addressing social justice issues in America.  The course proceeds on the explicit premise that leadership involves service to others for the common good.

Professor of Law
Race and the Law
Constitutional Law
Human Rights Law
Myth and Cult in Ancient GreeceClassics; Mythology; Religion
Julie Laskaris
CRN: 15424

This course will explore ritual practice in ancient Greece and its reflection in Greek myth.  It will be of particular interest to students interested in classical studies, archaeology, history, art history, anthropology, religion, and literary studies.  Some main goals will be for students to learn the meanings and functions of ritual practice in Greek culture and to see how myth may elucidate those meanings and functions.  Primary sources will be both textual and archaeological/art historical.  Primary textual sources will include Hesiod's Theogony, Homeric and Orphic Hymns, tragic plays, and ancient mythographers.  Archaeological evidence from the sites of religious worship, and the depictions of ritual on vase paintings and other works of art will be the major non-textual sources.  Readings from secondary sources will include selections from Walter Burkert, Structure and History in Greek Mythology and Ritual, and several articles on narrowly focused topics.  Topics will include:  sacrifice (animal, human, other), pilgrimmage, boundary-crossing (oracles and divination, visiting the underworld, transvestism), hero and heroine cult, rites of passage (birth, the decision to keep or expose an infant, coming-of-age, marriage, death), mystery religions, and foundation myths.

Associate Professor of Classical Studies
Chair, Department of Classical Studies
Ancient Medicine
Gender in Antiquity
Magic
Noble Beasts: Animals in Life and LiteratureLiterature; Animal Studies; English
Joyce MacAllister
CRN: 15574

Our relationship with animals has been both varied and long-standing.  Indeed, for centuries, animals have served us as companions, servants, entertainers, and prey. Only recently, however, have scholars representing a variety of disciplines begun to pool their resources to extend our knowledge of the emotional and rational capacities of animals.  Many are arguing, moreover, that this knowledge has significant implications for our own behavior. James Serpell is one of these. A faculty member at U. Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine, Serpell encourages us to consider both the contributions animals have made to our lives and the problems and responsibilities these experiences have incurred.  In keeping with his charge, we will explore accounts from history, literature, and contemporary research regarding the ways animals have improved our lives (e.g. in protecting us, in providing models of communal interaction, in serving as sources of comfort, and in providing recreation and entertainment).  In dealing with the problems of these relationships, we will explore such contemporary conflicts as those between defenders of "animal rights" and proponents of "animal welfare."  We will also examine issues relating to the care and sustenance of animals, particularly with reference to advances in veterinary technology and medicine.

Associate Professor of English
History & Biography
Rhetoric & Composition
Persuasion and Law in AntiquityClassics; History; Law
Walter Stevenson
CRN: 15425
Though we may think that the polished speeches are as much a part of modern trial lawyers as their tailor-made suits, Pineider briefcases and Lexus sedans, this form of discourse has a history stretching far back into antiquity. Not only do courtroom harangues have a deep history, but this course will argue that the invention of set speeches to juries in ancient Athens began western culture's endless fascination with clear, persuasive writing and speaking. So in this seminar we will explore how developments in Greek and Roman culture created particular linguistic conventions for the courts that have remained practical to this day. Concepts of clarity, sequential thought, consistency, coherence, eloquence and style will be studied and exercised.
Associate Professor of Classical Studies
Affiliated Faculty
Ancient History
Roman Imperial Society
Greek and Latin Literature
The Philosophy of FreedomEthics; Justice; Politics
Javier Hidalgo
CRN: 15294

Is freedom valuable? Why should we care about it? In this course we will examine the nature and value of freedom. We will consider the value of different freedoms, such as freedom of expression and economic freedom, and explore the relationship between freedom and various public policy issues, such as immigration, hate speech, prostitution, drug use, and human enhancement. The readings will be philosophical papers on these topics.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Immigration
Citizenship
Global Leadership
Poetry and MusicPoetry; Music
Richard Becker
CRN: 15563

This course will feature guided listening to and reading of modern poetry and modern music. Beginning with their romantic forerunners the course will work its way through a century of modernists including a few post moderns of late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Beginning with poetry of Emily Dickinson and music of Robert Schumann we will conclude with poetry of Billy Collins and music of John Adams. The key objective is the nurturing of reading and listening more critically for deeper experiences of these art forms.

Associate Professor of Music, Coordinator of Piano Studies
Piano performance
Composition
Poetry
Racism without racists: The contemporary science of diversity and inequalityRacism; Diversity
Crystal Hoyt
CRN: 15292

Traditional psychological approaches to understanding diversity often located the root of inequality in overt negative attitudes. However, contemporary research into prejudice reveals that it is now expressed in much more nuanced and subtle ways and it persists because it remains largely unrecognized. Social scientists no longer solely focus on overt animosity directed toward minority individuals but now focus on how biases can arise from normal cognitive, motivational, and sociocultural processes. This course will explore the causes and consequences of social identity (race, gender, sexuality, class...) based inequalities by focusing broadly on the subtle nature of contemporary biases.

Professor of Leadership Studies and Psychology and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Women and Minority Leaders
Stereotypes and Discrimination
Complex social issues
Representing Social Problems in America, 1880-1940Photography; Literature; Film
Margaret Denton
CRN: 15606
This course will consider social issues in America from the 1880s to 1940 through primary and secondary texts, photographs, and films. We will analyze how each of these mediums narrate stories, authenticate experience, communicate ideologies, and impact the reader/viewer. We will look at the ways in which texts and images overlap, intersect, and sometimes contradict each other.
Associate Professor of Art History, Emerita
18th, 19th and 20th Century Art History
History of Photography
Resilience, Optimism, and HappinessPsychology; Self
Andrew Newcomb
CRN: 15633

How do we deal with adversity and find happiness? In this course we will explore the process of resilience as a pathway humans use to cope with challenge in their lives. Using a multi-dimensional ecological perspective we will examine how cultural and contextual factors influence protective processes that underlie human wellbeing. From this framework we will study the special role that optimism plays in dealing with life events. Finally we will consider whether resilience and optimism lead to happiness or if happiness is simply a cognitive construction that can be found regardless of the adversity in our lives.

Professor of Psychology, Emeritus; Dean of Arts and Sciences, Emeritus
The Rhetorical Lives of MapsMedia and Communication; International; History
Tim Barney
CRN: 15580 and 15581

This course is a historical and critical interpretation of how maps aided and complicated America's rise to international power.  The processes, production, display, and circulation of maps gave way to a "geographic imagination" that constrained both policy and popular culture - in turn, Americans saw their place in the world in very spatialized ways.  From a rhetorical perspective, maps gave us specific and partial perceptions of the globe and cartographers from a host of different institutions and with various national and international interests (government institutions like the State Dept., the CIA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions like the American Geographic Society, popular magazines like National Geographic and Time, and corporations as diverse as Rand McNally and Google) sketched the contours of American identity in both longitude and latitude.  The course teaches students how to critique maps as systems of visual codes and also contextualizes for them how maps are used as rhetorical strategies by American elites and publics; by both the powerful and those challenging the powerful.  Not only then is this a course on cartography; it's a course on the wild world-making processes of U.S. geopolitics and international space.

Associate Professor
Visual rhetoric
Internationalism
Discourses of space and place
Cold War public address
Eastern European political culture
Sex, Mindfulness and the LawLaw; Sex; Mindfulness
Shari Motro
CRN: 15403

Historically, Western societies' main mechanism for regulating sex and reproduction was marriage. In recent decades, the criterion for socially legitimate sex has shifted from marriage to consent. What is consent? If non-consensual sex is bad, does that mean that all consenual sex is good, or at least neutral? How does, and how should the law shape sexual culture? This course uses legal theory, mindfulness meditation and communication practices, and creative writing to examine these issues, with a special focus on the implementation of Title IX on college campuses generally, and at the University of Richmond in particular.

Professor of Law
Professor of Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law (PPEL)
Tax Law and Policy
Gender and the Law
Information Design and the Law
Mindfulness
Social UtopiasHistory; Utopias
Sydney Watts
CRN: 15298

This course explores the idea of utopia and how it has been put into practice among several "intentional communities" in Europe and the United States.  The course begins with the study of Plato's Republic and Thomas More's Utopia and continues with the hsitorical examination of several utopian communities of the late 18th and early 19th centuries.  The class will also visit and learn from communities in the richmond area that strive to make the world a better place.

Associate Professor of History and WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Advisory Board Member
Early Modern Europe
18th Century France
Summons to Conscience: Questioning Civil Rights Leadership and Popular Misconceptions of the Freedom StruggleCivil Rights; Race; African American
Julian Hayter
CRN: 15594

Historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall contended, "...remembrance is always a form of forgetting, and the dominant narrative of the civil rights movement...distorts and suppresses as much as it reveals". Conventional stories of the American civil rights movement demonstrate that direct-action protests and non-violent resistance helped end Jim Crow segregation. In popular memory, we often attribute these freedom struggles and subsequent civil rights legislation to a handful of activists and policymakers. While Martin Luther King's eloquence inspired generations of activists and President Johnson's appeals for an equality of results standard shaped the civil rights bills, everyday people played an integral role in civil rights activism and policy creation. This course utilizes contemporary literature from the mid-20th century and recent historical scholarship to interrogate the essence of civil rights organizational strategies. To that end, we will examine how supposedly average Americans were central to the development of modern liberalism. The course will not only examine mid-20th century social movements, but also how civil rights legislation influenced American equality after 1965.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Modern African American History
American Civil Rights Movement
African American Politics in Richmond, Virginia
American Political Development after 1945
The Search for the SelfInterdisciplinary; Literature
Marcia Whitehead
CRN: 15340
The course will explore various avenues for finding or creating an identity as expressed in texts representing several literary genres, including novels, poems, memoirs, short stories, and philosophical works. Students will analyze and discuss texts from a wide range of cultural settings and will be asked to look beyond their assumptions of personal autonomy or "nature/nurture" dichotomies. Texts are likely to include most of the following: Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart; Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions; Rich, Adrienne Rich's Poetry and Prose; Augustine,Confessions; Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat; Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents; Beauvoir, The Second Sex; Sophocles, Oedipus Rex; Borges, Labyrinths.
Humanities Librarian
Trauma and Recovery in the Modern NovelLiterature; Novel; Recovery
Elizabeth Outka
CRN: 15573

In this course, we will consider how literature depicts various kinds of physical and emotional trauma, exploring the ways that novels, poems, and plays can, as Shakespeare noted, "Give sorrow words." We will also examine how literature portrays the possibilities for recovery, and how it may itself become an avenue for renewal, offering both writers and readers ways to witness, record, and remember past traumas. Alongside the literature, we will investigate different psychological theories of trauma and its aftermath, and various approaches to recovery, from therapeutic treatment to historical efforts such as Desmond Tutu's South African Commission on Truth and Reconciliation.

Associate Professor of English
Modernism
Twentieth-century British and Irish literature and culture
History of the novel
War Reporting: The American Experience: Journalism; History; Political Science
Robert Hodierne
CRN: 15423

Students will examine how the American media have covered wars starting with the American Revolution and progressing through the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Wars are a central part of American history. For better or worse, media coverage of those wars affected both the decision to wage war and the ways in which those wars were waged. The professor has covered the wars in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.

Professor of Journalism
Chair, Department of Journalism
Documentary film
Photojournalism
Water: From Noah's Flood to KatrinaWater; Literature; International
Walid Hamarneh
CRN: 15607

One of the earliest natural forces to face human beings was water. It was a challenge, but more importantly it was the life giver and the life destroyer. Many cultures represented this ambivalent attitude towards water in their myths and literature. Water became through floods the means of destroying the old and giving birth to the new. In our modern times, we still gaze at water with similar ambivalence. We will look at the representations of this complex attitude to water in literature and other cultural forms that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of water.

Where is Cuba?Cuba; Salsa; Latin Jazz
Michael Davison
CRN: 15564

The country does not appear on a US flight map.  To be Cuban does not mean that you are an American actor, or the owner of the Dallas Mavericks.  Cuba is a country, geographically so close, but philosophically and politically so distant.  This course will explore the history and culture of Cuba through its music and dance.  It will also explore the students' attitudes and beliefs toward Cuba and Cubans.  We will read, write, listen, dance and eat Salsa!  We will also study and listen to first-hand recordings and videos of Cuba exploring Latin jazz - a blending of American jazz with Cuban rhythms.

Professor of Music
Director of Jazz Ensemble
Trumpet performance
Jazz studies
The White House Said Today: Rhetoric of the Executive BranchRhetoric and Communication Studies; Politics; Media and Communication
Linda Hobgood
CRN: 15582 and 15583

This course is a semester-long study of the presidency as conveyed by chief executives in their own words, by official utterances from those appointed to speak on the president's behalf, by official public appearances and remarks of first ladies, speechwriters' recollections, mediated interpretations by members of the White House press corps and scholarly analyses of presidential discourse.  We will explore foundational rhetorical precepts and introduce the nature and practice of rhetorical criticism via the genre of contemporary presidential speeches and commentary.  Course objectives include:  providing a rhetorical perspective of language, leadership, politics and media, introducing terms and practices fundamental to rhetoric; to encourage confidence in using them, and demonstrating the epistemological value of rhetorical inquiry.

Director, Speech Center
Faculty member, Rhetoric and Communication Studies
Business & Professional Speech
Interpersonal Communication
Group Communication
Political Rhetoric
Public Speaking
Rhetoric of Contemporary First Ladies
Speech Writing
Theory & Pedagogy
Wrongful Convictions in Modern America - Costs, Causes, and SolutionsInterdisciplinary; History; Law
Mary Tate
CRN: 15295

In the United States, there have been over 240 exonerations achieved through advances in DNA testing capabilities. Seventeen of those DNA exonerations arose in cases where individuals were sentenced to death. There is an additional universe of wrongful convictions that involves cases where proof of innocence is not biological in nature. Such cases pivot around other sources of exculpatory evidence, including recanted testimony, mistaken identification or official misconduct. The production of wrongful convictions is a lens through which society can examine a plethora of important realities. Race, poverty, faith in science and reason, notions around punishment and redemption and the allocation of scarce resources are all fluidly and dynamically tied to the study of wrongful convictions.

Director, Institute for Actual Innocence
Clinical Professor of Law
Wrongful Convictions
Actual Innocence Commissions
Post-Conviction Remedies
Baseball in Film and LiteratureFilm; Baseball; Literature

Robert Kenzer
CRN: 16179 and 16180

This seminar explores how baseball has been portrayed in American film and literature through four mediums: documentary, feature film, fiction, and non-fiction. The course will encourage students to think about the ways these mediums reveal how baseball has embodied critical aspects of American society including race and ethnicity, urbanization and suburbanization, business, labor-management relations, and media. While all the levels of baseball will be touched on, the primary focus will be Major League Baseball.

Professor of History and American Studies
William Binford Vest Chair of History
19th Century United States
Civil War Era
Capitalism and its DiscontentsHistory; Justice; Society
Eric Yellin
CRN: 16183

This course will consider how philosophers, novelists, social reformers, economists, and ordinary people have understood, promoted, opposed, and sought to reform capitalism since the eighteenth century. Focused on the history of the United States, the course will encourage students to think about the social and political implications of capitalist and anti-capitalist ideologies. Readings will examine inequality, work, gender roles, and class and racial hierarchies in the past and today. Authors include Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Franklin Roosevelt, Milton Friedman, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Thomas Piketty.

Associate Professor of History and American Studies
Modern United States
U.S. Political and Social History
African American History
Changing Consumer CultureMarketing; International
Dana Lascu
CRN: 16111 and 16112

What does it mean to be part of a global consumer culture? This course will undertake a socio-culturally inspired analyses of consumption, addressing global consumer culture from multiple perspectives -- marketing (primarily), economics, communication, gender studies, anthropology, history, and sociology.  We will examine the impact of globalization on consumers from low- and medium-income countries, and their consumption as a consequence of and in tandem with consumption patterns and rituals in high-income countries. Among others, the course will engage in a critical analysis of global consumerism based on readings from industry and from popular culture sources.

Professor of Marketing
Marketing Research
International Marketing
Chocolate: Food of the GodsFood policy; Sustainability; Consumption; Slavery; Fair Trade
Andy Litteral
CRN: 16059 and 16060

This course introduces students to college level work by requiring them to read and think critically about the topics of sustainability, nutrition, poverty, modern day slavery, free and fair trade, and the role of multinational corporations in the production and consumption of chocolate. We will examine botanical, cultural, economic, and ethical issues associated with chocolate from its origin 4000 years ago until the present. We will do so by conducting academic research, making connections to existing programs on the UR Campus, local activist organizations, and local businesses that have chocolate as a main product.

Civic Journalism & Social JusticeJournalism; Social Justice
Tom Mullen
CRN: 16184

This course will explore the various ways that journalism has functioned as an instrument of social justice through identification and publication of issues that include poverty, racism, war, health, religion, education and other related topics. Students will study case histories in which journalists have brought public attention to important social concerns and the ways in which those concerns were resolved to bring about more just communities. Research includes identifying contemporary issues of concern and applying basic journalism training to create awareness of specific social situations. This fall, students will take part in a journalism department project to help produce work related to the Library of Congress Veterans History Project.

Director of Public Affairs Journalism
Collecting the Past: Museums and the Writing of HistoriesMuseums; Memory; Collecting; Historical preservation
Tze Loo
CRN: 16296

This course uses museums as a way to investigate how societies collect their pasts and the stories they want to tell of themselves. It asks students to think seriously about the act of collecting, and how value – whether historical or cultural – are ascribed to certain objects. This course foregrounds the particular power of material culture to act as physical evidence around which societies construct narratives of their past. In paying attention to the politics of collecting, students are introduced to the processes by which the historical pasts are constructed and represented.

Associate Professor of History and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor, Asia
Japanese Colonialism
Okinawan History
Heritage Studies
Death and CommemorationAntiquity; Death; Classical Studies

Elizabeth Baughan
CRN: 16175

Through literary texts, inscriptions, and monuments from the ancient Mediterranean (including Egypt and the Near East as well as the Classical world), we will explore ancient approaches to death and memorial and what these may tell us about ancient beliefs, social structures, and ideologies.  Primary source material will be drawn from: Egyptian tombs and funerary texts; Gilgamesh and Near Eastern funerary monuments; Greek and Latin poetry (works of Homer, Pindar, Bacchylides, Sophocles, Vergil, Propertius, and others); Greek and Roman historical accounts (such as Herodotus, Thucydides, and Suetonius); Greek, Etruscan, and Roman funerary art and epitaphs; and archaeological evidence for burial rituals. Themes to be explored include: death and the "hero," the tomb monument as a source of memory, the language of burials, the symbolism of funerary rituals, the significance of funerary banquets, war memorials and communal graves, and beliefs concerning the "underworld" and afterlife.

Associate Professor of Classics and Archaeology
Archaic Greek Art and Poetry
Anatolian Archaeology
Achaemenid Art
Funerary Monuments and Traditions
Democracy and the DeficitPolitical Science; Democracy; Political Economy
Daniel Palazzolo
CRN: 16194

It is not hyperbole to say that the Federal budget deficit has been the most vexing domestic policy problem since the 1960s. If the Federal government continues on its present course of deficit spending, which most experts consider to be "unsustainable," the problem and its consequences are bound to get much worse.  Today's college students will be among the many Americans who will inherit the mounting debt.  This seminar will explore the fiscal, political, and moral dimensions of the Federal budget deficit and the compounding debt left in its wake. Most importantly, the seminar will consider the manner and extent to which a democratic regime can address sufficiently the problems of deficit spending. Thus ultimately the course is about the capacity of democracy to deal with a large and complex problem, an issue that raises questions about representation, equality, and fairness.

Professor of Political Science
Associate Dean
American Government
Budget Policy and Politics
Congress
Campaigns and Elections
Virginia Government and Politics
Education and SocietyEducation; Society; Citizenship
Tom Shields
CRN: 16208

This course will examine the history and role of K-12 education in our American republic. From the vision of Thomas Jefferson for common schools in Virginia to the No Child Left Behind legislation, public (and private) education has been crucial in educating for citizenship, moral character, and for productivity.

Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs
Associate Professor, Education
Program Chair, Graduate Education
School Liaison, AFAC
Member, SPCS Speakers Bureau
Educational Leadership
School & Housing Segregation
Changing Demographics in RVA
Ethics & Leadership
Entrepreneurship and Innovation as Drivers of Economic Growth and National SecurityEconomics; Capitalism; Entrepreneurship
Porcher Taylor
CRN: 16209

“Entrepreneurial capitalism” is a form of capitalism where entrepreneurs, who continue to provide breakthrough ideas that meet the test of the marketplace, play a central role in the system. This capitalist system is punctuated by large numbers of the actors within the economy who not only have an “unceasing drive and incentive to innovate” but also undertake and commercialize revolutionary innovations and inventions. Is entrepreneurial capitalism “a new view of the wealth of nations” and an innovation pathway to global growth during this jobless recovery? This seminar will explore how entrepreneurial capitalism can advance both economic growth and national security.

Program Chair, Paralegal Studies
Professor, Paralegal Studies
Associate Professor of Management
Paralegal studies
Ethics and International AffairsWar; Economic Inequality; Immigration
David Lefkowitz
CRN: 16189

This course will focus on ethical issues raised by war, international economic inequality, and immigration. Among the questions we will discuss are: What makes people morally liable to attack in time of war? What, if anything, justifies so-called collateral damage? Can terrorism ever be morally justifiable? Are the enormous economic inequalities between states morally justifiable? Is it just to treat as more important the economic wellbeing of our co-nationals or fellow citizens than the economic wellbeing of foreigners? Finally, what if anything justifies states in placing restrictions on immigration? Are there any criteria for restricting immigration that are morally impermissible? 

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law (PPEL)
Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Ethical Theory
Applied Ethics
Films of the 30'sFilm; History; Narrative
Walter Schoen
CRN: 16200

The students will be asked to "read" films as cultural reflections of the times in which they are created.  This "reading" will include analysis of narrative as well as cinamagraphic techniques used in the creation of movies.  The course will be driven by the question, "Can a popular medium such as film be a primary source for understanding history?

Associate Professor of Theatre
Acting
Directing
Shakespeare
Theatre in Russia
Games, Game Theory and Leadership StudiesGames; Game Theory; Leadership Studies
Kristin Bezio
CRN: 16203

This course focuses on the principles of games and gaming; the relevance of game theories to societies, history, and geopolitics; and on the importance of these principles to issues of leadership and leadership studies. We will use a variety of games - board games, psychology games, videogames, and game theory - to examine significant concerns and issues relevant to discussion of leadership theories and practices. For example, the course might examine how the board game Monopoly brings to light issues of economics and class inequalities, as well as the way in which its mechanics enforce social and economic behaviors in the players.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Leadership in Literature & Film
Leadership in Performance
Cultural & Political History (Early Modern England)
New Media and Gaming
Hip-Hop TheaterPopular Culture; Social Justice; Theater and Performance Studies
Patricia Herrera
CRN: 16198 and 16199
For the last forty years, the presence of hip hop has greatly impacted our national culture, global economy, political dialogue, and artistic imaginations. It has spawned different modes of communication, oratory styles, dances forms, and fashions. In this course we will examine the ways hip hop has influenced contemporary American theatre. To understand the social significance of the dramatic texts we will read this semester, we will first examine the historical development, political drive, and aesthetics of hip hop. We will study the works of the Last Poets, Gil Scott Heron, Danny Hoch, Aya De Leon, Nilaja Sun, Kamilah Forbes, Sarah Jones, Will Power, and Universes, among others. Most importantly, we will analyze how hip hop practitioners use theatre to address key social justice issues, such as racial, sexual, gender, and socioeconomic equity, anti-consumerism, anti-militarization, and anti-corruption. Music, live performance, film, video, the written word and web-based content will coincide with class lectures and discussions. Students will perform excerpts from plays discussed in class or create original pieces for their final project.
Associate Professor of Theatre
Theatre as Social Change
20th and 21st Century American Theatre and Performance
Latina/o Cultural Productions
Solo Performance
Documentary Theatre
Gender and Performance
Hip Hop Performances
Human Trafficking: Yesterday and TodayHuman Trafficking
Rob Nelson
CRN: 16206
This seminar will explores the centrality of the domestic slave trade to the culture and economy of the American South and the U.S. as a whole during the nineteenth century. It also considers the contemporary relevance of the slave trade from two angles: the increasing prominent, sometimes divisive topic of memorializing the slave trade, especially in Richmond, and the continuities and discontinuities of the trade with twenty-first century human trafficking.
Director, Digital Scholarship Lab
19th century United States
Digital humanities
Italy's Forgotten HistoryItalian history; Renaissance; Nationalism
Christine Contrada
CRN: 16207

The history of Italy from the end of the Renaissance until the formation of the nation state in 1861 has received far less attention from the academic community than its more prosperous past has. We will explore a deeply divided Italy and carefully consider the view that the peninsula went through a steep economic, political, social, and cultural decline during these centuries. The course will explore the larger themes of degeneration and revival within the framework of dynamic leadership and historical memory in the context of the creation of modern national identity.

Knowing and Choosing in the Face of Adversity and UncertainitySelf; Interdisciplinary; Literature
Mavis Brown
CRN: 16176

There are many lenses through which to analyze the human experience.  In this seminar we will examine knowing on the one hand, and various ways of choosing in the face of uncertainty on the other as these concepts play out in selected literary texts. Toward the end of the course, we will shift our focus to ways individual human beings go about fashioning their lives that will hopefully lead to human happiness and fulfillment.

Associate Professor of Education
Educational policy and school reform
21st century framework for learning
Child and adolescent development/diverse learners
Weaving children's literature into the curriculum
Global awareness: cultural and educational perspectives
The Language of Poetry
Brian Henry
CRN: 16177

Poetry has been described as “a language within a language” as well as “a language of inquiry.” This course examines how the language of poetry both originates in and differs from conventional language. What makes a poem? What makes something “poetic”? How does poetic language function? What is possible in poetry that is not possible elsewhere? What possibilities does poetry offer for other kinds of writing? Students will read and listen to poems while also learning to recognize poetry in non-literary sources (such as political speeches and song lyrics) as well as in fiction and nonfiction.

Professor of English and Creative Writing
Contemporary American, Australian, British poetry
Slovenian poetry (as translator)
Law, Justice, and the Common GoodCrime; Punishment; Justice
Richard Dagger
CRN: 16190 and 16191

This course will explore important themes in political and legal philosophy by examining novels, plays, and short philosophical works that pose such questions as the following:  What, if anything, gives some people authority over others? When, if ever, is breaking the law justified? What distinguishes the rule of law from sheer power? How do we come to have rights? What is freedom, and how important is it? Is there such a thing as the public interest; and if there is, do citizens have a duty to promote it?

E. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Chair in the Liberal Arts
Chair, Department of Political Science
Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law (PPEL)
Political and legal philosophy, with special interests in republicanism, political obligation, and the justification of punishment
Love and Its ComplicationsPsychology; Philosophy; Self
Ray Hilliard
CRN: 15922

In this seminar we will try to read (or view), discuss, and write about eight written texts and three films (or filmic texts) that deal with the topic of love in divergent ways. The authors of the various texts all assume that love - of one or another type - is central to human happiness, but they also all believe that people typically encounter serious impediments in the search for fulfillment in love. In one of its important meanings, the word "complications" in the title of the seminar refers to such impediments and to the strategies that people use in trying to overcome them. The various texts have been chosen in part not only because each of them presents a distinctive perspective on the seminar topic, but also because they reflect some of the important kinds of writing or film-making that influential thinkers (a philosopher, a founder of modern psychology) and artists (both literary and cinematic) have chosen as means of exploring the topic of love. Which is to say that the texts we'll examine are all quite demanding (their complexities reflect the complexities of the ideas they explore) and are meant to help you become stronger readers and thinkers - college-level readers and thinkers. We'll begin by learning about some of the ideas propounded by two of the most influential theorists of love in the history of Western culture, Plato and Sigmund Freud, and then go on to examine a considerable diversity of literary and cinematic texts--novels, a play, a group of poems, and three films--in which the complexities of love are explored, not at a theoretical level, but at the level of actual human or personal experience.

Professor of English
Eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century British novel
Modern American Human Rights Lawyers: Leadership and Community ServiceLaw; Leadership; Community Service
Jonathan Stubbs
CRN: 16205

Many lawyers become leaders and serve in rolesranging from heads of local civic and religious institutions, to President of the United States. This course explores the relationship between the law and leadership. It will challenge students to refine what leadership means to them in theory as well as provide practical experiences for reflection. The specific focal point for such thought and writing will be roles that lawyers have played in addressing social justice issues in America. The course proceeds on the explicit premise that leadership involves service to others for the common good.

Professor of Law
Race and the Law
Constitutional Law
Human Rights Law
Poetry and MusicPoetry; Music
Richard Becker
CRN: 16186

This course will feature guided listening to and reading of modern poetry and modern music. Beginning with their romantic forerunners the course will work its way through a century of modernists including a few post moderns of late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Beginning with poetry of Emily Dickinson and music of Robert Schumann we will conclude with poetry of Billy Collins and music of John Adams. (See attached preliminary reading list). The key objective is the nurturing of reading and listening more critically for deeper experiences of these art forms.

Associate Professor of Music, Coordinator of Piano Studies
Piano performance
Composition
Poetry
Noble BeastsLiterature; Animal Studies; English
Joyce MacAllister
CRN: 16178 and 16291

Our relationship with animals has been both varied and long-standing.  Indeed, for centuries, animals have served us as companions, servants, entertainers, and prey. Only recently, however, have scholars representing a variety of disciplines begun to pool their resources to extend our knowledge of the emotional and rational capacities of animals. In this course, we will explore accounts from history, literature, and contemporary research regarding the ways animals have improved our lives (e.g. in protecting us, in providing models of communal interaction, in serving as sources of comfort, and in providing recreation and entertainment).  In dealing with the problems of these relationships, we will explore such contemporary conflicts as those between defenders of "animal rights" and proponents of "animal welfare."  We will also examine issues relating to the care and sustenance of animals, particularly with reference to advances in veterinary technology and medicine.

Associate Professor of English
History & Biography
Rhetoric & Composition
Ownership and Identity in Middle EarthTolkien; Property Rights; Law
Sandra Joireman
CRN: 16192 and 16193

J.R.R. Tolkien had an excellent understanding of how what we pursue and what we possess can define us. This class will investigate issues of possession and control over property beginning in literature and film with Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings and moving on to understanding of property and possession in law and social science.

Associate Provost for Faculty
Weinstein Chair of International Studies
Professor of Political Science
Comparative Politics
International Development
Property Rights
Customary Law
Legal Development
Post-conflict Migration
The Pious and the Profane: Monks, Nuns, and Medieval Society and CultureMedieval; Monasticism; History
David Routt
CRN: 16181

The Pious and the Profane explores Christian monasticism from its fourth-century origin in Egypt, Palestine, and Syria through the creation of the Jesuit order in the sixteenth.  It traces how the ascetic practice embraced by individual hermits outside the established church became, in its communal Benedictine form, an integral element of the medieval church.  The course delves into monastic reform (Cluniac, Cistercian), crusading monastic orders (Templars, Hospitallers), mendicant monasticism (Franciscans, Dominicans, Poor Clares), and the depiction of monks and nuns in medieval vernacular literature (e.g., Chaucer, Boccaccio).  The course concludes with the portrayal of medieval monasticism in modern popular culture.

Power and Prejudice of LanguagePower; Prejudice; Language
Elizabeth Kissling
CRN: 16121

Why do certain accents sound good or bad?

Who decides what is “proper” English?

Why do we change our speech style?

Students will learn that our views about accent are linguistically arbitrary. Students will expose language prejudices in the world around them, starting with television and film.  Next, they will explore the construction of “standard” language and debunk popular notions about “African American English” and “Spanglish.” They will learn about educational practices that either support or disenfranchise speakers of nonstandard varieties. Finally, students will learn about how linguistic style constructs identity and shapes social interaction. They will analyze their own speech and discover their prejudices about language.

Assistant Professor of Spanish and Applied Linguistics
Second language acquisition
Language teaching methods
Phonetics and pronunciation instruction
Spanish in the US
Puzzles and Paradoxes: Time Travel, Infinity Philosophy, Time, Science
Geoff Goddu
CRN: 16113

What are we to make of the sentence "I am lying now" or the possibility that there is an infinite amount of stuff in the universe or that if backward time travel were possible, it seems you could prevent your father from ever meeting your mother?  This course will explore potential solutions to these conundrums and the methodology of producing solutions.  Other problems tackled may include puzzles concerning reference, ambiguity, infinity, causation, freedom, reasoning, and probability.

Professor of Philosophy
Chair, Department of Philosophy
Philosophy of Language
Philosophy of Mind
Logic
Philosophy in Science Fiction
Racism Without RacistsDiversity; Racism
Crystal Hoyt
CRN: 16201

Traditional psychological approaches to understanding diversity often located the root of inequality in overt negative attitudes. However, contemporary research into prejudice reveals that it is now expressed in much more nuanced and subtle ways and it persists because it remains largely unrecognized.  Social scientists no longer solely focus on overt animosity directed toward minority individuals but now focus on how biases can arise from normal cognitive, motivational, and sociocultural processes.  This course will explore the causes and consequences of social identity (race, gender, sexuality, class….) based inequalities by focusing broadly on the subtle nature of contemporary biases.

Professor of Leadership Studies and Psychology and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Women and Minority Leaders
Stereotypes and Discrimination
Complex social issues
Resilience, Optimism, and HappinessPsychology; Self
Andrew Newcomb
CRN: 15923 and 15924

How do we deal with adversity and find happiness? In this course we will explore the process of resilience as a pathway humans use to cope with challenge in their lives. Using a multi-dimensional ecological perspective we will examine how cultural and contextual factors influence protective processes that underlie human wellbeing. From this framework we will study the special role that optimism plays in dealing with life events. Finally we will consider whether resilience and optimism lead to happiness or if happiness is simply a cognitive construction that can be found regardless of the adversity in our lives.

Professor of Psychology, Emeritus; Dean of Arts and Sciences, Emeritus
Rewriting the BibleBiblical Studies; Popular Culture
Stephanie Cobb
CRN: 16195 and 16196

Biblical stories and characters offer guidelines for believers’ moral lives, but they also offer inspiration for theological challenge and artistic expression. This course explores ancient and modern rewritings of biblical stories that expand stories, change points of view, and fill in narrative gaps, all in an attempt to tell a new story that is filled with new meaning. The course analyzes the ways retellings—for example, legends, films, TV documentaries, plays, and novels—draw on, depart from, and compete with the original stories as they reflect and construct new political, social, and theological worlds.

George and Sallie Cutchin Camp Professor of Bible
Chair, Department of Religious Studies
Program Coordinator, Jewish Studies
Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Studies Program
New Testament
Early Christianity
The Search for the SelfSearch, Self

Marcia Whitehead
 CRN: 16199

This course is about the many ways in which we think about and question the nature of the self. Is it material, psychological, spiritual, social, economic? How does it come into being? Why do we commonly assume its continuing existence through changing time, space, physical condition, and social circumstance? Our readings will be drawn from many disciplines and perspectives, including literature, philosophy, neurology, psychology, and art.

Humanities Librarian
Self-Fulfillment & Self-DenialSelf; Western Thought
Hugh West
CRN: 16182

An investigation of the meaning of, relationship between, and practical value of two prominent, but apparently contradictory precepts of Western moral thought: one which asks us to realize our fullest potential as unique individuals; another which commands us to sacrifice ourselves to some greater good. To achieve this we will (except for the Greeks, where the procedure is reversed) follow a pattern of reading a theoretical statement on one side of the other of the question, then following it with consideration of works, mostly fictional, that test the applicability of such principles to life. Authors to be considered will include Homer, St. Paul, Goethe, J.S. Mill, and Camus.

Sex, Mindfulness and the LawLaw; Sex; Mindfulness
Shari Motro
CRN: 16204

Historically, Western societies' main mechanism for regulating sex and reproduction was marriage. In recent decades, the criterion for socially legitimate sex has shifted from marriage to consent. What is consent? If non-consensual sex is bad, does that mean that all consenual sex is good, or at least neutral? How does, and how should the law shape sexual culture? This course uses legal theory, mindfulness meditation and communication practices, and creative writing to examine these issues, with a special focus on the implementation of Title IX on college campuses generally, and at the University of Richmond in particular.

Professor of Law
Professor of Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law (PPEL)
Tax Law and Policy
Gender and the Law
Information Design and the Law
Mindfulness
Social UtopiasUtopia; History; Western Thought
Sydney Watts
CRN: 16295

This course explores the historical and fictional examples of social utopias. We begin by asking ourselves, “What does utopia look like?” and then learn what some the greatest Western thinkers have imagined when asking themselves the same question. Our study of Plato’s Republic, More’s Utopia, and Rousseau’s Second Discourse on Inequality will focus on utopian thinking as a thought experiment, utopia as a social and political critique, and the realization of social utopia as a problem of individual will as much as the common good. Finally, we will turn to the study of nineteenth-century utopian socialism and feminism as a response to revolutions in France and Britain. 

Associate Professor of History and WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Advisory Board Member
Early Modern Europe
18th Century France
Social Justice & US Food PoliticsPolitics; Social Justice; Food
Jennifer Erkulwater
CRN: 16212

Focusing on poverty in the United States, this course examines how people can suffer from food insecurity in a nation so materially affluent and so blessed with cheap and abundant food.  It is an examination of federal anti-poverty, agriculture, and supplemental nutrition policies, and it asks students to critically analyze the links between federal policies, on the one hand, and hunger and health problems in low-income communities, on the other hand.  The course concludes with an examination of recent citizens’ movements aimed at bringing healthy, affordable food to the poor (farmer’s markets, urban gardens, food trucks, and feeding programs) and considers whether these citizen efforts are sufficient.  

Associate Professor of Political Science
Social Welfare Politics
Public Policy
American Politics
Representing Social Problems in America, 1880-1940Photography, Literature, Film
Margaret Denton
 CRN: 16348

This course will consider social issues in America from the 1880s to 1940 through primary and secondary texts, photographs, and films. We will analyze how each of these mediums narrate stories, authenticate experience, communicate ideologies, and impact the reader/viewer. We will look at the ways in which texts and images overlap, intersect, and sometimes contradict each other.

Associate Professor of Art History, Emerita
18th, 19th and 20th Century Art History
History of Photography
Storytelling and IdentityStorytelling, Oral Histories
Terry Dolson
 CRN: 16359

Does everyone have a story? Do we tell ourselves stories?  Are they true? This course explores the role that stories play in forming our own identity, forming relationships with others, forming community, and forming the structures through which we understand our world.  We will learn about  folktales and fairy tales through research,  critical reading, critical writing, and telling them aloud.   We'll consider where oral storytelling is happening currently aided by the internet. Students will also grapple with these concepts by participating in peer mentoring through story-sharing with local incarcerated youth.

Associate Director, Community-Engaged Learning
Summons to ConscienceCivil Rights; Race; African American
Julian Hayter
CRN: 16202

Historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall contended, “…remembrance is always a form of forgetting, and the dominant narrative of the civil rights movement… distorts and suppresses as much as it reveals”. Mid-20th century social movements not only repudiated de jure and de facto segregation, but they also rejected firmly entrenched ideologies (e.g., scientific racism, social Darwinism, etc.) that helped perpetuate dispossession throughout America’s vulnerable communities. As it happened, these social movements instigated a culture of rights that changed the relationship between Americans and the state. This culture of rights also helped bring about legislation that not only protected African Americans, but also America’s women, impoverished, mentally ill, and physical challenged. Yet, we attribute these freedom struggles and the actualization of civil rights legislation to a handful of activists and policymakers. This course utilizes contemporary literature from the mid-20th century and recent historical scholarship to interrogate the essence of civil rights organizational strategies. To that end, this course is designed to examine how Americans became active agents in the promotion of a more inclusive America. We will also study the impact civil rights legislation has had on American life.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Modern African American History
American Civil Rights Movement
African American Politics in Richmond, Virginia
American Political Development after 1945
Time and the City of SevilleSpanish history; Atlantic world; Seville; Roman Empire; Spanish Empire
Aurora Hermida-Ruiz
CRN: 16122 and 16123

This course is an introduction to Seville as one of the most important cities in the history and culture of Spain, from its ascendancy during the Roman Empire to its decline in the 18th century. The course focuses on Seville as [1] an ideal entry point to learn about both the Mediterranean and the Atlantic history of Europe up until the eighteenth century, and [2] one the major fantasy sites of European and North-American Romantic orientalism in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Associate Professor of Spanish
Medieval and early modern Spanish literature
Spanish literary historiography (concepts, periodization, canon formation)
Watching the WirePopular Culture; Social Issues
Paul Achter
CRN: 16197

Frequently hailed as a television masterpiece, “The Wire” created a vivid and detailed portrait of Baltimore that focused on its police, drug trade, shipping docks, city hall, public schools, and newspapers. In the series, one reviewer said, Baltimore stood for the parts America “where drugs, mayhem, and corruption routinely betray the promise of ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”  "The Wire” ask audiences to look at places, people and stories that mainstream television--and other media--customarily ignores. Students will analyze the series, and they will research and write about the problems that face urban America.

Associate Professor of Rhetoric
Rhetorical Theory and Rhetorical Criticism
Rhetoric and Racism
Television
American Political Culture
War Rhetoric
What Does Sound Say? World Music; Balinese Music; Human Behavior; Soundscapes; Cultural Anthropology; Ethnomusicology
Andrew McGraw
CRN: 16187

This course is an introduction to listening, broadly conceived, from a variety of philosophical and cultural perspectives. Just as does architecture, the soundscape of a place both reflects and influences human behavior and thought. How can we be more fully aware of our soundscape, its meanings, and implications? What do privilege, poverty, and capitalism (for instance) sound like? Students will have the opportunity to study the traditional musics (on authentic instruments) of several cultures to help illustrate the ways in which the aesthetic and philosophical ideals of a people are embodied (and occasionally resisted) in their music. instruments etc., we will also discuss music’s relationship to social life through its capacity to shape and be shaped by social structures and customs. We will study music as culture—music as a symbol of social values and of cultural, group and individual identity—through conducting original ethnographic projects.

Associate Professor of Music
Ethnomusicologist
Southeast Asian traditional and experimental musics
Intercultural performance
Rhythm analysis
Why Do We Build? Why Should We Care?Architecture
Jeannine Keefer
CRN: 16185

Architecture has long been the vehicle for expressing power relationships. We will explore political, religious, economic, and social power relationships as expressed in the built environment with specific structures and urban interventions. Some will be familiar to you, some are no longer extant, and some will be new sites to consider.

Visual Resources Librarian
Well-behaved Women (Rarely) Make Scientific Historywomen and gender; scientific community; education; employment
Jacque Fetrow
CRN: 16174

Despite increasing educational and employment opportunities for women in recent decades, the representation of women in science and technology remains low. Former Harvard president Lawrence Summers said he was being provocative when he stated that innate differences between men and women might be one reason fewer women succeed in science and math careers; the controversy surrounding these comments ultimately led to his resignation. We will explore these issues and related questions, including: Does the American educational system adequately prepare girls to succeed in science? Who are role models for the next generation of women scientists? How does the media portray women scientists?

Across the Continents: The Art of the Short StoryShort Stories; Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Literature
Lucas Izquierdo
CRN: 25038

What can modern short stories tell us about a multicultural world? In this seminar we shall study a series of short stories written by authors belonging to vastly contrasting cultures. Focusing on nineteenth and twentieth century literature we shall consider topics relevant to short story writing and criticism from around the globe.

BioethicsBiology; Ethics
Linda Boland
CRN: 24981

Stem cell therapy. Human cloning. Genetic testing. Organs for sale. Physician-assisted suicide. Constantly in the news and at the forefront of political, legal, and religious agenda, these phrases are associated with strong emotions and opinions. How do we develop decisions about these critical issues? What information and principles guide ethical decisions in medicine and what are the consequences for humanity? In this seminar, we will study ehtical questions in medicine and biomedical research. We will learn to approach problems in bioethics from a variety of perspectives, guided by ethical principles and centered on an understanding of relevant concepts in human biology and scientific technology.

Associate Professor of Biology
Neuroscience
Molecular Physiology
Ion Channels
Bioethics
Capitalism and Its DiscontentsHistory; Society; Justice
Eric Yellin
CRN: 25031

This course will consider how philosophers, economists, novelists, social reformers, and ordinary people have conceived of, promoted, opposed, and sought to reform capitalism since the Eighteenth Century. Focused on the Western world, the course will encourage students to think about the social and political meanings and impacts of capitalist and anti-capitalist ideologies. Readings will examine industrialization, imperialism, work, gender roles, class and racial hierarchies in the past and today. Authors may include Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Max Weber, W.E.B. DuBois, Edith Wharton, Emma Goldman, Milton Friedman, Joh Kenneth Galbraith, William Julius Wilson, and Barbara Ehrenreich.

Associate Professor of History and American Studies
Modern United States
U.S. Political and Social History
African American History
Changing International Consumer Culture in a Digital WorldMarketing; International
Dana Lascu
CRN: 25048

What does it mean to be part of a global consumer culture? This course will undertake a socio-culturally inspired analyses of consumption, addressing global consumer culture from mutliple perspectives -- marketing (primarily), economics, communication, gender studies, anthropology, history, and sociology.  We will examine the impact of globalization on consumers from low- and medium-income countries, and their consumption as a consequence of and in tandem with consumption patterns and rituals in high-income countries. Among others, the course will engage in a critical analysis of global consumerism based on readings from industry and from popular culture sources.

Professor of Marketing
Marketing Research
International Marketing
Civic Journalism & Social JusticeJournalism; Social Justice
Tom Mullen
CRN: 25036

This course will explore the various ways that journalism has functioned as an instrument of social justice through identification and publication of issues that include poverty, racism, war, health, religion, education and other related topics. Students will study case histories in which journalists have brought public attention to important social concerns and the ways in which those concerns were resolved to bring about more just communities. Research includes identifying contemporary issues of concern and applying basic journalism training to create awareness of specific social situations. This fall, students will take part in a journalism department project to help produce work related to the Library of Congress Veterans History Project.

Director of Public Affairs Journalism
Contemplative Traditions in ArtArt; Religion; Literature
Mark Rhodes
CRN: 25033

This course will examine the visual art, poetry and music connected to or inspired by three important and influential world contemplative religious traditions.  Though there are, at some levels, enormous differences between Zen, Sufism and Mystical Christianity, there are also surprising similarities in the aims, methods, approaches, and most importantly, the language used by great practitioners of these traditions.  We will study a selection of primary texts, and since these texts explore religion at an esoteric level, they are very challenging.  We will also devote a limited amount of time reading from scriptures, including Buddhist Sutras, The Old and New Testaments, and the Quran.

Democracy and EducationEducation; Democracy
Nathan Snaza
CRN: 24725 and 24726

This course will investigate the historical, social, political, and philosophical contexts of American schools and debates about school reform.  Through readings, discussions, volunteer work in Richmond Public  Schools, autobiographical essays, and an individual research project, students will explore the complicated - even contradictory - relations between schooling and democratic life in the U.S.  Readings will begin with essays by "Founding Fathers" Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Rush and conclude with a unit on how the OCCUPY movement (especially in NYC and Chicago) intersected with grassroots activism by parents, students and teachers to resist the increasing corporatization of public schools.

Director, Bridge to Success Program
Modern Narrative, primarily British and American
Literary Theory and Continental Philosophy
Posthumanism
Social and Cultural Foundations of Education, Critical Pedagogy, Literacy Studies
Sexuality and Gender Studies
Democracy and the DeficitDemocracy; Political Economy; Political Science
Dan Palazzolo
CRN: 25084

It is not hyperbole to say that the Federal budget deficit has been the most vexing domestic policy problem since the 1960's.  If the Federal government continues on its present course of deficit spending, which most experts consider to be "unsustainable," the problem and its consequences are bound to get much worse.  Today's college students will be among the many Americans who will inherit the mounting debt.  This seminar will explore the fiscal, political, and moral dimensions of the Federal budget deficit and the compounding debt left in its wake.  Most importantly, the seminar will consider the manner and extent to which a democratic regime can address sufficiently the problems of deficit spending.  Thus ultimately the course is about the capacity of democracy to deal with a large and complex problem, an issue that raises questions about representation, equality, and fairness.

Professor of Political Science
Associate Dean
American Government
Budget Policy and Politics
Congress
Campaigns and Elections
Virginia Government and Politics
Democracy in America? The Political Thought of Alexis de Tocqueville and W.E.B. DuBoisDemocracy; Race; American political development
Thad Williamson
CRN: 25045

This course will introduce students to the complexities of American democracy and American history through close study of two of its leading students and critics, Alexis de Tocqueville and W.E.B. DuBois.  Particular attention will be paid to the fundamental contradiction between the epochal significance of emergent norms of white male democracy in the United States and the reality of race-based oppression and domination, before and after Emancipation. In the first half of the course students will read virtually all of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, both volumes. In the latter part of the course students will read a selection of DuBois's most vital work including his biography of John Brown, The Souls of Black Folk, and excerpts from Black Reconstruction and Dusk of Dawn. Secondary reading will be quite limited and may include excerpts from Sheldon Wolin's study Tocquevill Between Two Worlds and Lawrie Balfour's Democratic Reconstruction: Thinking Politically With W.E.B. DuBois. The course will consider each thinker in depth on his own terms, and in dialogue with one another. Connections to contemporary issues in American society will be made in discussion throughout the course, but the primary aim is to give students a deeper grounding for thinking about American society in their subsequent coursework.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law
Urban Politics and Sprawl
Community Economic Development
City of Richmond Politics
Sports, Justice, and Ethics
Descartes' Philosophy: A Gateway Into Modern Theories of Knowledge and RealityPhilosophy; Skepticism; Self

Brannon McDaniel
CRN: 24959

This course will introduce students to epistemology and metaphysics through Renee Descartes' seminal work "Meditations on First Philosophy". The course will alternate between reading and thinking about the Meditations, and examining texts that are related to the themes raised by Descartes' philosophy. Some central philosophical themes that may be discussed include skepticism, foundationalism in epistemology, how to demonstrate the existence of self and of God, mind-body dualism, and free-will.
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Metaphysics
Epistemology
Philosophy of Science
Education and SocietyEducation; Society; Citizenship
Tom Shields
CRN: 25041

This course will examine the history and role of K-12 education in our American republic. From the vision of Thomas Jefferson for common schools in Virginia to the No Child Left Behind legislation, public (and private) education has been crucial in educating for citizenship, moral character, and for productivity.

Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs
Associate Professor, Education
Program Chair, Graduate Education
School Liaison, AFAC
Member, SPCS Speakers Bureau
Educational Leadership
School & Housing Segregation
Changing Demographics in RVA
Ethics & Leadership
Faith and Difference in America: Learning to Live TogetherFaith; Globalization
Craig Kocher
CRN: 25046

Religious faith is central to the daily life and identity of a majority of the population in the United State. As a result of globalization, individuals and communities with diverse worldviews - both religious and secular - interact more closely than ever before, with results ranging from insightful dialogue to violent discord. Furthermore, religious convictions shape debate about a range of policies in domestic affairs, leading at times to unified action for peace and justice, and at other times to rancor and mistrust. This course will investigate these tensions in light of students' own commitments and beliefs those of others, and the increasingly diverse society in which we live.

University Chaplain
Jessie Ball duPont Chair of the Chaplaincy
Films of the 1940's: Paranoia, Patriotism or PropagandaFilm; History; Narrative
Walter Schoen
CRN:25032
The students will be asked to "read" films as cultural reflections of the times in which they are created.  This "reading" will include anlaysis of narrative as well as cinamagraphic techniquesed used in the creation of movies.  The course will be driven by the question, "Can a popular medium such as film be a primary source for understanding history?
Associate Professor of Theatre
Acting
Directing
Shakespeare
Theatre in Russia
The Five (or Ten) Best (Physics) Experiments Ever!Physics
Con Beausang
CRN: 25095

This course will examine the people and stories behind some of the key experiments in physics.  We will focus on experiments which have radically altered our views of the world or universe around us or which have radically altered our civilization by the technology they enabled. Inspired by and loosely based on the text "The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments" by George Johnson the course will explore great physics experiments from history as well as some of the more amazing experiments underway.

Professor of Physics, Robert E. and Lena F. Loving Chair
Low-energy nuclear structure physics
Gamma-ray spectroscopy
Stockpile Stewardship
Environmental Radiation
Framing the US ConstitutionLaw; Legal History
John Pagan
CRN: 25043
This course provides an examination of the making of the United States Constitution, focusing on the political ideas that led to the creation of the American republic; the Constitutional Convention of 1787; the ratification debates, and the adoption of the Bill of Rights. Through our readings and discussion, we will undertake a critical examination of the lofty ideals and pragmatic compromises that produced the framework of American government.
From Paris (Texas) to Berlin: The Cinema of Wim WendersFilm; Literature
Olivier Delers and Martin Sulzer-Reichel
CRN: 24872

This course will explore the cinema of the acclaimed German director Wim Wenders.  We will use his films to explore different topics: the identity of Berlin as a city filled with war memories and post-modern interrogations in Wings of Desire (1987), the American landscape and the kind of stories it produces in Paris, Texas (1984), Cuban music in Buena Vista Social Club (1999), or moden dance as an art for in Pina (2011), to give only a few examples. Since Wenders has worked with different styles of films, and in different countries, we will also look at what unites his work as a cinematographer, from his recent interest in 3D technology. Wim Wenders' work also offers a systematic reflection on what distinguishes film as a medium from other narrative forms. From his very early beginnings, Wenders dealt with the relationship between film and literature.  In 1972, he adapted Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter to the screen and in the same year directed The Goalkeeper's Fear of the Penalty, a film based on a short-story by Peter Handke, with whom Wenders has worked in the decades since. One important aspect of the course will therefore be exploring the role of cinema as an alternative way of telling stories and as a tool for reflecting on the power of language, images, and music.

Associate Professor of French
Chair, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
18th Century French Studies
Film Studies
Games, Game Theory and Leadership StudiesGames; Game Theory; Leadership Studies
Kristin Bezio
CRN: 25047

This course focuses on the principles of games and gaming; the relevance of game theories to societies, history, and geopolitics; and on the importance of these principles to issues of leadership and leadership studies. We will use a variety of games - board games, psychology games, videogames, and game theory - to examine significant concerns and issues relevant to discussion of leadership theories and practices. For example, the course might examine how the board game Monopoly brings to light issues of economics and class inequalities, as well as the way in which its mechanics enforce social and economic behaviors in the players.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Leadership in Literature & Film
Leadership in Performance
Cultural & Political History (Early Modern England)
New Media and Gaming
Gender, Sexuality and ScienceBiology; Culture; Gender
Roni Kingsley
CRN: 24982

Is the doing of science objective?  If so, does it matter who does it, or, as a human endeavor, is there subjectivity in science?  Why is the doing of science largely considered to be a masculine enterprise?  Has it always been this way?  How does science define and describe gender and sexuality?  Does this have an influence on how society defines and describes them?  How do people from sexual minorities define their own genders and sexualities?  What is the impact of having science and society define and describe them differently?  This course will address these and other questions as we explore how scientific knowledge is constructed as well as how it establishes and affects our understanding of gender and sexuality.

Genes and BehaviorBiology; Behavior; Genetics; Science
Kathy Zoghby
CRN: 24980

Human behavior can be attributed to a complex interaction between the influence of our environment and our individual genetic complexity. Students will learn some very basic genetic principles to aid them in their understanding of genetic contributions to common behavioral disorders such as depression, psychosis, addictions, dementia and anxiety. Students will look at the effect of these behaviors on society as a whole, and also relate to them from a more personal perspective. Students will examine questions concerning the possibility that sometimes our behavior is out of our control and we cannot help how we behave. This concept has implications for criminal behavior as well as our everyday interactions with each other. Hopefully students will appreciate that the line between "normal" and "abnormal" is not easily defined.

Adjunct Lecturer of Biology
Health Care Politics and Policy Around the WorldState; Markets; Political Science
Tracy Roof
CRN: 24984 and 24985

This course is both a first year seminar and one of the Tocqueville seminars focused on studying the U.S. from a comparative or international perspective. The United States has a more limited and targeted welfare state than most other wealthy, industrialized countries and has stood out as the only country among its peers without universal access to health care coverage. This course will look at the differences in health care policy and politics between U.S. and countries such as Canada, Japan, and those of Western Europe. It will cover the comparative historical development of various health care systems and the relative role of the private sector and the government in providing, paying for, and regulating access to health care. It will also look at how recent health care reforms in the U.S. compare with the policies developed in other countries and how various political forces such as organized labor, doctors' organizations, and legislative insitutions shape policy.

Associate Professor of Political Science
American political institutions
Legislative process
Public policy
Organized labor
Interest groups
Jazz and the Beat GenerationAmerican Studies; Literature; Music; English
Bert Ashe
CRN: 24727

Jazz music was born in the United States around the beginning of the 20th century as a creative mixture of African rhythms and European harmonies.  But the jazz aesthetic has spread far beyond mere music: American creative writers of the 20th century - particularly those of the Beat Generation - wewre deeply influenced by jazz in several ways: jazz as subject matter, jazz as formal influence, and jazz as cultural commentary.  The  chief tension in American jazz has to do with using jazz as a chaotic primitivist release, using jazz to open cultural space in order to escape middle class values and/or middle America, vs. jazz as a discipline, as a musical art form, and as a valid cultural medium for blues transcendence.  This course will address ways that the Beat Generation, among others, responded to jazz and African-Americans, and will also explore ways that the jazz community and American cultural critics responded to the Beats.  Ultimately, we will use the relationship between jazz and the Beat Generation to explore the way jazz, musically and culturally, "spoke" to 20th-century Aamerica.

Professor of English
African American Literature and Culture
20th Century American Literature
Black Vernacular Tradition
Post-Blackness
Is Jewish-Christian Dialogue Possible?Religion; Politics
Frank Eakin
CRN: 24971

Anti-Judaism has been a reality for Jews since prior to the emergence of Christianity, but with Christianity a new form of anti-Judaism emerged, i.e., theological anti-Judaism.  Through readings and discussions we will seek to understand this phenomenon historically.  The period of the holocaust served as a pivotal change of focus.  Prior to the holocaust rampant anti-Judaism existed but with little attention given to its curtailment ecclesiastically.  The holocaust and its aftermath convinced many Christians of an ecclesiastical complicity with what happened to the Jews during this horrendous period, and thus during the post-holocaust period many Christian bodies have sought to express in formal papers the relationship of the churches to Judaism.  Is there light at the end of the proverbial tunnel?  To seek answers, we will analyze Biblical and non-Biblical materials, written and artistic, and their impact upon Jewish-Christian Dialogue.

Weinstein-Rosenthal Professor of Jewish and Christian Studies
Old Testament history and thought
American Judaism
Knowing and Choosing in the Face of Adversity and UncertainitySelf; Interdisciplinary; Literature
Mavis Brown
CRN: 25098

There are many lenses through which to analyze the human experience. In this reading-intensive course of challenging texts, we will examine knowing on the one hand, and various ways of choosing in the face uncertainty and adversity on the other, as these concepts play out in selected classic texts. In the second part of the semester, we will examine the ways in which contemporary individuals seek to fashion happy and fulfilling lives, as we shift our focus to a 21st century situation of adversity that demands change.

Associate Professor of Education
Educational policy and school reform
21st century framework for learning
Child and adolescent development/diverse learners
Weaving children's literature into the curriculum
Global awareness: cultural and educational perspectives
Latin American Politics and FilmLatin America; Politics; Democracy
Jennifer Pribble
CRN: 24902

For most of the 20th century, Latin America was characterized by unstable political and economic regimes.  Indeed, in countries as diverse as Argentina and El Salvador, democracy had a difficult time taking root, and repressive authoritarian rule was common.  Latin America also faced significant economic challenges throughout this time period, experimenting with several development models; many of which produced volatile growth, high debt, and severe boom-bust cycles.  By the turn of the 21st century, however, the political-economic landscape of Latin America appeared to have shifted. Beginning in the 1980s, the region began to witness unprecedented democratic stability and by the early 2000s economic growth had begun to pick up steam. Still, the countries in the region continue to face several difficult challenges, including high levels of inequality, organized crime, and citizen discontent. This course will explore the region's turbulent politics, focusing on core concepts from comparative politics, including revolution, dictatorship, democracy, development, and the state. The course will combine both written analysis and film to introduce students to the region and to the field of Political Science.

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Politics and Diplomacy
Latin American Politics
Comparative Political Economy
Comparative Welfare States
Comparative Politics
Political Parties
Lost in TranslationCulture; Literature; Film
Kathrin Bower
CRN: 24873

Translation seems to be a straightforward concept, but has many applications and meanings. In this course, we will explore how translation affects the communication of ideas across languages, cultures and time. In the process, we will investigate how translation requires sensitivity to linguistic nuance, social mores, cultural values, historical understanding, political organization and heirarchical power relations. Where are the points of cohesion and collision in cross-cultural and cross-linguistic encounters? What does calculated mistranslation and feigned obtuseness reveal about social values? How are translators/interpreters perceived under conditions of colonization and conflict? What methods can be applied to the process of translation? What are the goals of translation? How can translation generate a greater appreciation for the connections between language, culture and history?

Professor and Coordinator of German Studies
Associate Dean
East/West German Relations
German Cultural Studies
German Film
Holocaust Representation
Political Satire
Turkish German Comedy
Moral Antecedents of the Global Economic CrisisEconomics; Ethics; Morality
Jonathan Wight
CRN: 24918 and 24919

This course analyzes the Great Recession of 2008-2009 and the role that changing ethical norms may have played in causing the financial market collapse.  We begin by addressing basic concepts from ethics, economics, history and philosophy.  The intellectual backdrop for our work is provided by philosopher/economist Adam Smith.  Here are some of the questions students will pursue:  How do natural instincts combine with humanly-devised institutions to create economic success (or failure)?  Did greed play a role in creating this recession?  Does the invisible hand of the market depend on greed?  Is self-interest virtuous or vicious?  Are human actions always rational?  Can institutional reforms prevent another financial collapse?

Professor of Economics
Professor of International Economics, International Studies Concentration Advisor: International Economics
Ethics of capitalism
Economics of globalization
Adam Smith
Moral Philosophy: How should we live?Philosophy

Miriam McCormick
CRN: 24960

An introduction to central questions of moral philosophy through the study of classic texts. The central thinkers examined will be Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. Some of the fundamental questions we will investigate through these texts are the following: What things are worth pursuing? What constitutes a good life? What constitutes a moral life? What is the relation between the two? How do we reason about what to do? Can reason determine how one ought to live, or how one ought to treat others? Can reason motivate us to act in accordance with those determinations? What are moral judgments, and why are we influenced by them? Can moral judgments be objective; are there any moral truths? Is true altruism possible or are all our motives ultimately self-interested? Can virtue and morality be taught? Throughout the term we will take note of the ways in which our authors differ, not just in the answers they give to these questions, but in the questions they take to be most central.

Muslim Women in the MiddleReligion; Literature; Interdiciplinary
Nuray Grove
CRN: 24871

This course will examine the role of women in bringing change to modern Islamic societies.  We will read books about several Muslim countries, and focus in depth on the role of women in modern day Turkey. The books written by Muslim women will provide students with firsthand knowledge about women who adhere to their faith while living in a progressive society.  We will also read books written about Islam and women, watach movies about the lives of women in Islamic countries, and carry out "long-distance" research by interviewing women living in Turkey.

Narratives of Identity & RelationshipNarratives of Identity and Relationships
Scott Johnson
CRN: 24901

Story plays a central role in creating our senses of identity and relationship. Narratives of various forms help establish who we believe we are, how we see ourselves in relation to others, our personal ideologies, and our behavior in interactions with those around us. Gender, race, social class, ethnicity, ability, friendships, family, sexual identity, profession, religious beliefs...these and countless other aspects of our lives are in many ways given meaning through the narratives in and around us, and they are brought to life in our communication behavior. In this course, we will explore in depth the role of narratives in shaping who we are and how we interact with others.

Associate Provost for Student Academic Initiatives
Associate Professor of Communication Studies
Communication Education
Interpersonal and Group Communication
Communication Theory and Research
Noble Beasts: Animals in Life and LiteratureLiterature; Animal Studies; English
Joyce MacAllister
CRN: 24724

Our relationship with animals has been both varied and long-standing.  Indeed, for centuries, animals have served us as companions, servants, entertainers, and prey. Only recently, however, have scholars representing a variety of disciplines begun to pool their resources to extend our knowledge of the emotional and rational capacities of animals.  Many are arguing, moreover, that this knowledge has significant implications for our own behavior. James Serpell is one of these. A faculty member at U. Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine, Serpell encourages us to consider both the contributions animals have made to our lives and the problems and responsibilities these experiences have incurred.  In keeping with his charge, we will explore accounts from history, literature, and contemporary research regarding the ways animals have improved our lives (e.g. in protecting us, in providing models of communal interaction, in serving as sources of comfort, and in providing recreation and entertainment).  In dealing with the problems of these relationships, we will explore such contemporary conflicts as those between defenders of "animal rights" and proponents of "animal welfare."  We will also examine issues relating to the care and sustenance of animals, particularly with reference to advances in veterinary technology and medicine.

Associate Professor of English
History & Biography
Rhetoric & Composition
Open Water: The Centrality of OceansBiology; Ocean Ecology
Malcolm Hill
CRN: 25034

Open Water will explore the influence that the world's oceans have had on literature, art, history, politics, society, and science. Using a variety of sources, students will be asked to evaluate how and why a land-based, large-bodied mammal would be so reliant on the marine world. Through detailed and critical analysis of a variety of primary sources, students will gain a better appreciation of the visible and invisible influence marine habitats have on their daily lives.

The Rhetorical Lives of MapsMedia and Communication; International; History
Tim Barney
CRN: 24900

This course is a historical and critical interpretation of how maps aided and complicated America's rise to international power.  The processes, production, display, and circulation of maps gave way to a "geographic imagination" that constrained both policy and popular culture - in turn, Americans saw their place in the world in very spatialized ways.  From a rhetorical perspective, maps gave us specific and partial perceptions of the globe and cartographers from a host of different institutions and with various national and international interests (government institutions like the State Dept., the CIA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions like the American Geographic Society, popular magazines like National Geographic and Time, and corporations as diverse as Rand McNally and Google) sketched the contours of American identity in both longitude and latitude.  The course teaches students how to critique maps as systems of visual codes and also contextualizes for them how maps are used as rhetorical strategies by American elites and publics; by both the powerful and those challenging the powerful.  Not only then is this a course on cartography; it's a course on the wild world-making processes of U.S. geopolitics and international space.

Associate Professor
Visual rhetoric
Internationalism
Discourses of space and place
Cold War public address
Eastern European political culture
St. Petersburg: The Myth and the City in Literature, Painting, and MusicVisual Culture; International Studies; Interdisciplinary
Joe Troncale
CRN: 25030

For Russians, St. Petersburg is much more than just another pretty face.  The city lives and breathes the spirit of what makes them and us who we are since we are ultimately the same.  Exploring the differences between the myth and reality of Petersburg through the arts locates us in the very place where those differences are born and find expression in the metalanguages of literature, music, and painting.  The very process of mythmaking as an alternate reality is where we discover ourselves, our highest aspirations and our darkest fears and, thanks to the Russian genius, the beauty of both.

Associate Professor of Russian
Russian literature
Russian art
Skeptics and EccentricsReligion; Philosophy; Skepticism
Jane Geaney
CRN: 24969 and 24970

This course explores the ideas of some of the most skeptical and original thinkers in the world. We read the works of ancient and modern authors, who raise questions that challenge conventions in the fields of philosophy, science, and religion. The course investigates their questions about things like the value of morality, the difference between human and non-human, and the possibility of reliable knowledge. This is a course for students who seek to question things.

Professor of Religious Studies
Conceptions of the body and language in early Chinese texts
Socrates & His LegaciesGreek and Roman Literature; Greek Democracy; History of Education
Dean Simpson
CRN: 24869

This course will concern the reappraisal of one of ancient Greece's best known figures, Socrates, whose historical significance, it may be argued, is obscured by his fame. The philosophical dialogues written by Plato give so many vivid images of Plato's mentor that we can hardly help believing that Socrates looked and sounded and thought just as Plato says. The ancient sources, however, are not unified on the question of the historical Socrates, and they gave rise to contrary traditions of Socratic influence that have been as important as Platonic philosophy.

In particular, countering Plato was Isocrates, a devoted follower of Socrates, a teacher of rhetoric, and a founder of the 'liberal arts.' The tension between Isocrates and Plato in the fourth century B.C.E. amounts to a conflict between interpretations of the meaning of Socrates' life and death. It is no less a conflict between world views and theories of educational philosophy. After studying the nature of this conflict, we will observe its reemergence in later times, in ancient Rome and early Christianity. We will also be able to analyze the roots of the distinctively American brand of education, also called 'the liberal arts.'

Space is BigAstronomy; Physics; Science
Emory Bunn
CRN: 24794

This course will examine three occasions in the history of Western thought when the conception of the size of the Universe underwent large expansions:   1) The transition from an Earth-centered to Sun-centered view of the Universe, which led to an enormous increase in estimates of distances to stars, and hence in the scale of the known Universe; 2) The gradual understanding, in the early 20th century, of an expanding Universe filled with billions of galaxies; and 3) Contemporary ideas of the multiverse, according to which our observed environment is only a tiny fraction of all that exists. The most extreme and controversial versions of the multiverse hypothesis propose that the very laws of physics vary throughout the Universe, and that our observed patch may be quite atypical. In the course of examining the amount of space in the Universe, we will examine ideas about the nature of space, which also underwent major shifts during each of these periods.

Professor of Physics
Chair, Department of Physics
Big Bang cosmology (theory and data analysis)
Storytelling, Identity, and Social ChangeSocial Justice; Theater and Performance Studies; Literature
Terry Dolson and Sylvia Gale
CRN: 25037

This course explores the role that life narratives—“stories”—play in shaping a community’s shared sense of identity and in enacting social change. Using a rhetorical lens to read a variety of life narratives produced at crucible moments in American history, we will consider how distinct storytelling methodologies have been used to inscribe, enforce, and/or upturn specific community norms and identities, and to mobilize or restrict change. Texts will include as-told-to and self-authored narratives, “imposter” narratives, oral histories, stories archived using digital media, and secondary sources on narrative storytelling, narratives and social movements, and community literacy.

Associate Director, Community-Engaged Learning
Director, Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
Taking it to the Streets: Old and New Media in the Education of the Public Media; News Media; History
Dan Roberts
CRN: 25039 and 25040

Taking it to the Streets will examine a variety of old and new media technologies.  It will review the resources available to public scholars for taking an informative and enlightening message to the general public.  The course will elucidate ways in which the humanities will help students master the traditional tools of research and turn them to their advantage for intergenerational education.  Then working alone or in teams, students will build some multimedia means of information dispersal.  They will craft accessible messages for a non-academic audience and then deliver them as research dossiers and oral presentations.

Program Chair, Liberal Arts
Professor, Liberal Arts
Telling the Past: Epics, Legends, and HistoryLiterature; History
Joanna Drell
CRN: 25080

What do fantastical stories of heroes and lovers, travelers and monsters tell us about Antiquity and the Middle Ages? This seminar challenges students to consider the meanings of "history", "fact", "fiction", "literature" when using such texts as Virgil's Aeneid (30-19 B.C.), Beowulf (ca. 8th c. A.D.), The Song of Roland (ca.12th c.), the lays of Marie de France (ca. late 12th/early 13th c.), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (ca. 14th c.), Dante's Inferno (ca. early 14th c.), and Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini's The Two Lovers (15th c.). A central question will be how historians can use narratives to understand the cultures we study.

Professor of History
Medieval Europe, Medieval/Renaissance Italy
Households, Family, and Gender in the Middle Ages
Medieval Southern Italy and Sicily
Medieval Frontiers
The Crusades
Touching the Past: The Purposes and Strategies of American HistoryHistory; Media; American Studies
Ed Ayers
CRN: 25049

History is everywhere, saturating everything from textbooks to television, from music to movies, from historic sites to video games, from academic journals to reenactments, from websites to radio.  This course will explore the range of media to understand why we think what we think about history, what each medium reveals and conceals, what each has to contribute.  It will focus on American history, especially the history of Richmond, where an especially rich, concentrated, and problematic past surrounds us.

Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and President Emeritus
The Civil War
Digital Humanities
Watching The Wire Popular Culture; Social Issues
Paul Achter & Andrea Simpson
CRN: 24983 and 25081

Frequently hailed as a television masterpiece, “The Wire” created a vivid and detailed portrait of Baltimore that focused on its police, drug trade, shipping docks, city hall, public schools, and newspapers. In the series, one reviewer said, Baltimore stood for the parts America “where drugs, mayhem, and corruption routinely betray the promise of ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”  "The Wire” ask audiences to look at places, people and stories that mainstream television--and other media--customarily ignores. Students will analyze the series, and they will research and write about the problems that face urban America.

Associate Professor of Rhetoric
Rhetorical Theory and Rhetorical Criticism
Rhetoric and Racism
Television
American Political Culture
War Rhetoric
Associate Professor of Political Science
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Advisory Board Member
Race and Ethnicity
Gender
Political Communication
Water: From Noah's Flood to KatrinaWater; Literature; International
Walid Hamarneh
CRN: 24870

One of the earliest natural forces to face human beings was water. It was a challenge, but more importantly it was the life giver and the life destroyer. Many cultures represented this ambivalent attitude towards water in their myths and literature. Water became through floods the means of destroying the old and giving birth to the new. In our modern times, we still gaze at water with similar ambivalence. We will look at the representations of this complex attitude to water in literature and other cultural forms that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of water.

What's So Funny? An Exploration of Comedy and LaughterComedy; Theatre; Drama
Dorothy Holland
CRN: 25083
In our exploration of comedy and laughter, we will read a variety of theories about comedy and laughter (Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Freud, Kant, Bergson) along with plays and performance pieces from different time periods.  We will evaluate the theories, apply them to specific plays and/or performances, and weigh them against competing theories in order develop their own views about the forms and functions of humor and its relation to their lives and the world at large.
Associate Professor of Theatre and WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Advisory Board Member
Theatre history
Directing
Acting
Gender studies
Where is Cuba?Cuba; Salsa; Latin Jazz
Michael Davison
CRN: 25035

The country does not appear on a US flight map.  To be Cuban does not mean that you are an American actor, or the owner of the Dallas Mavericks.  Cuba is a country, geographically so close, but philosophically and politically so distant.  This course will explore the history and culture of Cuba through its music and dance.  It will also explore the students' attitudes and beliefs toward Cuba and Cubans.  We will read, write, listen, dance and eat Salsa!  We will also study and listen to first-hand recordings and videos of Cuba exploring Latin jazz - a blending of American jazz with Cuban rhythms.

Professor of Music
Director of Jazz Ensemble
Trumpet performance
Jazz studies
Working: An Examination of the Legal, Economic, and Social Aspects of the Nine to Five WorldLaw; Economics; Work
Steve Allred
CRN: 25044

This seminar explores the world of work in modern America, using a variety of sources ranging from U.S. Supreme Court opinions to first-person narratives. We will consider workplace questions of rights, social justice, motivation, challenges, social behavior, and economic necessity. Topics include legal foundations of the employment relationship, how that relationship has been modified by the courts and Congress, the broad spectrum of employment situations in which people of all ages perform their work, the dynamics and perils of the work environment, and how the working world has been portrayed by outside observers and employees.

University Professor
Employment Law
Wrongful Convictions in Modern America- Costs, Causes, and SolutionsInterdisciplinary; History; Law
Mary Tate
CRN: 25042

In the United States, there have been over 240 exonerations achieved through advances n DNA testing capabilities.  Seventeen of those DNA exonerations arose in cases where individuals were sentenced to death.  There is an additional universe of wrongful convictions that involves cases where proof of innocence is not biological in nature.  Such cases pivot around other sources of exculpatory evidence, including recanted testimony, mistaken identification or official misconduct. The production of wrongful convictions is a lens through which society can examine a plethora of important realities.  Race, poverty, faith in science and reason, notions around punishment and redemption and the allocation of scarce resources are all fluidly and dynamically tied to the study of wrongful convictions.

Director, Institute for Actual Innocence
Clinical Professor of Law
Wrongful Convictions
Actual Innocence Commissions
Post-Conviction Remedies
Across the Continents: The Art of the Short StoryShort Stories; Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Literature
Lucas Izquierdo
CRN: 25455

What can modern short stories tell us about a multicultural world? In this seminar we shall study a series of short stories written by authors belonging to vastly contrasting cultures. Focusing on nineteenth and twentieth century literature we shall consider topics relevant to short story writing and criticism from around the globe.

Baseball in Film and LiteratureFilm; Baseball; Literature

Robert Kenzer
CRN: 25752

This seminar explores how baseball has been portrayed in American film and literature through four mediums: documentary, feature film, fiction, and non-fiction.  The course will encourage four mediums: documentary, feature film, fiction, and non-fiction.  The course will encourage students to think about the ways these mediums reveal how baseball has embodied critical aspects of American society including race and ethnicity, urbanization and suburbanization, business, labor-management relations, and media.  While all the levels of baseball will be touched on, the primary focus will be Major League Baseball.

Professor of History and American Studies
William Binford Vest Chair of History
19th Century United States
Civil War Era
BioethicsBiology; Ethics
Linda Boland
CRN: 25667

Stem cell therapy. Human cloning. Genetic testing. Organs for sale. Physician-assisted suicide. Constantly in the news and at the forefront of political, legal, and religious agenda, these phrases are associated with strong emotions and opinions. How do we develop decisions about these critical issues? What information and principles guide ethical decisions in medicine and what are the consequences for humanity? In this seminar, we will study ehtical questions in medicine and biomedical research. We will learn to approach problems in bioethics from a variety of perspectives, guided by ethical principles and centered on an understanding of relevant concepts in human biology and scientific technology.

Associate Professor of Biology
Neuroscience
Molecular Physiology
Ion Channels
Bioethics
Buckwheat and Caviar: The "Sustainable" Planet in Russian Science and LiteratureRussia; Sustainability; Food Ecology
Yvonne Howell
CRN: 25574

What do sustainability, locavore diets, biodiversity, and the concept of the Anthropocene (our geological era, in which human activity is the dominant influence on planetary systems) have to do with Russian literature? Russian culture has been uniquely shaped by the vastness of its landscape (occupying one-sixth of the Earth’s landmass), offering a cross-cultural perspective on the relationship of human beings to other animals, plants, food production, climate cycles, and our collective destiny. Readings, films and fieldtrips will provide a thematic introduction to Russian and Soviet history, as well as an opportunity to “think locally” about sustainability issues.

Professor of Russian and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Modern Europe
Russian literature and culture
Czech literature and culture
Sociobiology in cross-cultural perspective
History of science (Soviet Union)
Communism: The Human ExperienceCommunist system; East Central Europe; Individual Choice
Aleksandra Sznadjer Lee
CRN: 25497

The course examines the politics of individual choice in the context of the Soviet-style communism that existed in eastern and central Europe from the end of the Second World War until 1989.  Using a combination of fiction, political essays, and film, the course examines both the evolving methods of cooptation and oppression used by this communist system and the individual and collective responses that entailed a combination of idealism, complicity, and resistance.  The course studies the political context of the difficult trade-offs people made between ambition, loyalty, friendship, love, fear, being true to their principles, and fulfilling their dreams.  The course also asks the students to apply the themes developed in the readings and films to the challenges and choices they witness in the world around them.

Associate Professor of Political Science
Comparative politics
Comparative political economy
European politics
Postcommunist transitions
Contemplative Traditions in ArtArt; Religion; Literature
Mark Rhodes
CRN: 25629

This course will examine the visual art, poetry and music connected to or inspired by three important and influential world contemplative religious traditions.  Though there are, at some levels, enormous differences between Zen, Sufism and Mystical Christianity, there are also surprising similarities in the aims, methods, approaches, and most importantly, the language used by great practitioners of these traditions.  We will study a selection of primary texts, and since these texts explore religion at an esoteric level, they are very challenging.  We will also devote a limited amount of time reading from scriptures, including Buddhist Sutras, The Old and New Testaments, and the Quran.

The Criminal BrainBiology; Psychology; Law
Cindy Bukach
CRN: 25557

This course will investigate the neuroscience behind criminal behavior and how an understanding of brain-behavior relationships can inform our basis for morality, justice, punishment, rehabilitation and forgiveness.  Students will use a variety of sources, including media reports, documentaries, movies, television shows, novels, scholarly journal articles and selected chapters from scholarly books to examine critical questions related to the criminal brain.  Guest speakers, including lawyers and/or a judge; clinicians and social workers, will be invited to discuss areas of their expertise.  A possible fieldtrip to Richmond City Jail will give students first-hand knowledge of Virginia’s criminal justice system.  Students will examine both their own beliefs as well as societal codes as they debate issues, write opinion papers and research papers, and take part in a mock trial.

Associate Professor of Psychology
Chair, Department of Psychology
Object recognition
Cognitive and neural mechanisms of the development and loss of perceptual expertise across the
lifespan
Organization of semantic knowledge
Category specificity in cognitively intact and impaired individuals
Face recognition
Cyberspace: History, Culture, FutureTechnology; Culture; Interdisciplinary
Joe Essid
CRN: 25470

William Gibson, who gave us the term "cyberspace" and described a dystopia of revolutionary hackers, "megacorporations," and collapsed governments in his 1984 novel Neuromancer, once noted that he intended his fictions as cautionary tales about the power of media. He found, to his chagrin, that a critical mass of hackers, gamers, and corporations decided that they wanted to build his "consensual hallucination." And by the mid-90s, the digital genie was out of the bottle: a new way of communicating, playing, and making money had emerged with the World Wide Web. In our breathless rush since then, we rarely stop to ask: How did we get to this point? Where might we be going? What costs and benefits might accrue from an age of constantly accelerating technological change? How could such change alter our identity as biological creatures, not to mention our careers, notions of privacy, and conceptions of intellectual property? Students taking this seminar would not only discuss the Web and cyberculture but get close to it in ways they may not have imagined from the "comfort zones" of Facebook and restricted course-management software like Blackboard. They'll see and actually explore a few cutting-edge venues online, and some of their work will help develop future iterations of this seminar.

Director, Writing Center
Technology in the classroom
Virtual worlds
Writing centers
Writing Across the Curriculum
Devil in the Details: Microhistory & Historical NarrativeReligion; History; New England
Doug Winiarski
CRN: 25508

Witches and heretics, religious prophets and confidence men, Indian captives and murdering mothers, cat massacres and slave conspiracies: these are the subjects of “microhistory,” a distinctive approach to the study of the past that seeks to reveal broader forces of historical change through detailed stories of obscure individuals and seemingly bizarre events. In this seminar, students learn how scholars research and write these gripping historical narratives and work in teams to develop their own microhistories based on rare archival documents from eighteenth-century New England.

Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies
Religion in early America
Native American religions
Religion and popular/material culture
Education and SocietyEducation; Society; Citizenship
Tom Shields
CRN: 25761

This course will examine the history and role of K-12 education in our American republic. From the vision of Thomas Jefferson for common schools in Virginia to the No Child Left Behind legislation, public (and private) education has been crucial in educating for citizenship, moral character, and for productivity.

Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs
Associate Professor, Education
Program Chair, Graduate Education
School Liaison, AFAC
Member, SPCS Speakers Bureau
Educational Leadership
School & Housing Segregation
Changing Demographics in RVA
Ethics & Leadership
Faith and Difference in America: Learning to Live TogetherFaith; Globalization
Craig Kocher
CRN: 25485

Religious faith is central to the daily life and identity of a majority of the population in the United State. As a result of globalization, individuals and communities with diverse worldviews - both religious and secular - interact more closely than ever before, with results ranging from insightful dialogue to violent discord. Furthermore, religious convictions shape debate about a range of policies in domestic affairs, leading at times to unified action for peace and justice, and at other times to rancor and mistrust. This course will investigate these tensions in light of students' own commitments and beliefs those of others, and the increasingly diverse society in which we live.

University Chaplain
Jessie Ball duPont Chair of the Chaplaincy
Food for ThoughtFood Studies; Literature; Philosophy
Julietta Singh
CRN: 25472 and 25473

This course sets out to examine how and why food has been such a persistent topic in scholarly and popular discourses across fields as diverse as cultural studies, economics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, history, and literature. We will investigate how scholars, writers, and artists in various media have employed food in their work - in some instances to inquire about eating disorders or the politics of global hunger, and in others as a metaphor for social belonging, alienation, or desire. Throughout the semester we will critically consider what diet has to do with identity, and how food and the body intersect in a variety of contemporary texts.

Framing the US ConstitutionLaw; Legal History
John Pagan
CRN: 25511
This course provides an examination of the making of the United States Constitution, focusing on the political ideas that led to the creation of the American republic; the Constitutional Convention of 1787; the ratification debates, and the adoption of the Bill of Rights. Through our readings and discussion, we will undertake a critical examination of the lofty ideals and pragmatic compromises that produced the framework of American government.
From Paris (Texas) to Berlin: The Cinema of Wim WendersFilm; Literature
Olivier Delers and Martin Sulzer-Reichel
CRN: 25575

This course will explore the cinema of the acclaimed German director Wim Wenders.  We will use his films to explore different topics: the identity of Berlin as a city filled with war memories and post-modern interrogations in Wings of Desire (1987), the American landscape and the kind of stories it produces in Paris, Texas (1984), Cuban music in Buena Vista Social Club (1999), or moden dance as an art for in Pina (2011), to give only a few examples. Since Wenders has worked with different styles of films, and in different countries, we will also look at what unites his work as a cinematographer, from his recent interest in 3D technology. Wim Wenders' work also offers a systematic reflection on what distinguishes film as a medium from other narrative forms. From his very early beginnings, Wenders dealt with the relationship between film and literature.  In 1972, he adapted Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter to the screen and in the same year directed The Goalkeeper's Fear of the Penalty, a film based on a short-story by Peter Handke, with whom Wenders has worked in the decades since. One important aspect of the course will therefore be exploring the role of cinema as an alternative way of telling stories and as a tool for reflecting on the power of language, images, and music.

Associate Professor of French
Chair, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
18th Century French Studies
Film Studies
Games, Game Theory and Leadership StudiesGames; Game Theory; Leadership Studies
Kristin Bezio
CRN: 25483

This course focuses on the principles of games and gaming; the relevance of game theories to societies, history, and geopolitics; and on the importance of these principles to issues of leadership and leadership studies. We will use a variety of games - board games, psychology games, videogames, and game theory - to examine significant concerns and issues relevant to discussion of leadership theories and practices. For example, the course might examine how the board game Monopoly brings to light issues of economics and class inequalities, as well as the way in which its mechanics enforce social and economic behaviors in the players.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Leadership in Literature & Film
Leadership in Performance
Cultural & Political History (Early Modern England)
New Media and Gaming
Global Medicine and HealingMedicine; Anthropology; Health
Jennifer Nourse
CRN: 25510

This is a seminar in medical anthropology. The seminar examines how people in cultures from around the world regard and heal illness. While Western biomedicine is acknowledged throughout the world as effective, in some cases, people turn to traditional or ethnomedical cures. How people articulate their selections in these medically plural environments raises a host of questions we will explore throughout the semester: How do people discuss their illnesses? Do they use metaphors ("I'm fighting a cold")? What is their process of healing? Our readings will conclude with consideration of healing efficacy, spiritual healing and pharmaceutical testing of herbal curing.

Associate Professor of Anthropology
Islamic Medicine
Traditional Medicine and Biomedicine in Southeast Asia and Beyond
Mothering, Midwifery and Ethnic Identity in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Political Autonomy and Ethnic Identity in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Guns in AmericaAmerican Studies
Laura Browder
CRN: 25751

The course will explore the cultural meanings of firearms in the United States, a nation in which gun ownership and citizenship are closely linked in the popular imagination —and have been, historically, enshrined in law.  We will look at the ways that groups of constituents —for example, women, African Americans, and immigrants —have been excluded from gun ownership and the ways in which this has become an issue of political power (think of the Black Panthers, who got their start as a political movement joining NRA members in a march on the California state house, in Sacramento, protesting proposed gun control legislation).  Because the state of Virginia has long been a center for debates over gun ownership, going back to some of the earliest gun regulations of the Virginia colonies, as well as the site of the nation's worst college massacre, Virginia Tech, we will focus much of our discussion on Virginia.

Tyler and Alice Haynes Professor of American Studies
Women in combat
American autobiography
Women and guns
American Communist Party (Earl Browder)
Civil rights in Richmond
Health Care Politics and Policy Around the WorldState; Markets; Political Science
Tracy Roof
CRN: 25499 and 25500

This course is both a first year seminar and one of the Tocqueville seminars focused on studying the U.S. from a comparative or international perspective. The United States has a more limited and targeted welfare state than most other wealthy, industrialized countries and has stood out as the only country among its peers without universal access to health care coverage. This course will look at the differences in health care policy and politics between U.S. and countries such as Canada, Japan, and those of Western Europe. It will cover the comparative historical development of various health care systems and the relative role of the private sector and the government in providing, paying for, and regulating access to health care. It will also look at how recent health care reforms in the U.S. compare with the policies developed in other countries and how various political forces such as organized labor, doctors' organizations, and legislative insitutions shape policy.

Associate Professor of Political Science
American political institutions
Legislative process
Public policy
Organized labor
Interest groups
Hearing Cinema: Music in Hollywood FilmFilm; Music; Cinema
Jeffrey Riehl
CRN: 25744

Through the study of eight Hollywood films, this course examines how music in film narration creates a point of experience for the spectator. Students consider what music is doing in the movies in the first place, and then how it does what it does. Students also examine what and how music signifies in conjunction with the images and events of a story film. By sensitizing students to the fore-and background levels of musical meaning in film, they will begin to hear cinema's uses of music in order to read films in a more literate way.

Associate Professor of Music, Director of University Choirs
Chair, Department of Music
Chair, Department of Music
Choral music of Slovenia
Sacred works of W.A.Mozart
Music and Religion
Choral and Vocal Pedagogy
Higher Education: From Aristotle to Animal HouseHistory of Education; Interdisciplinary; Morality
Paul Clikeman
CRN: 25578

This course will examine the writings of notable educators from the last 2500 years. Students will examine the evolution of the modern university, controversies over curricular content, competing objectives of liberal arts and vocational education, tensions between religious and secular viewpoints, and the role of extra-curricular activities.

Associate Professor of Accounting
Auditing
Auditor Independence
Accounting (Financial)
It's a bird...It's a plane...It's a reporter: The journalist in popular mediaJournalism; Popular Culture
Shahan Mufti
CRN: 25757

In this course students will explore the ways in which journalists have been portrayed in popular films, novels, comic-books, TV shows, theatre etc. during the twentieth century. From Charles Foster Kane (Citizen Kane) to Clark Kent (Superman) to Kermit the Frog (The Muppets) journalists come in many sizes and shapes in popular culture. Among other things, students will explore how the portrayal of journalists differs from one genre to another, and the ways in which it has evolved over time. In the process, they will be encouraged to consider the place of journalism in American society and its role in American democracy over the decades.

Associate Professor of Journalism
Is Jewish-Christian Dialogue Possible?Religion; Politics
Frank Eakin
CRN: 25509

Anti-Judaism has been a reality for Jews since prior to the emergence of Christianity, but with Christianity a new form of anti-Judaism emerged, i.e., theological anti-Judaism.  Through readings and discussions we will seek to understand this phenomenon historically.  The period of the holocaust served as a pivotal change of focus.  Prior to the holocaust rampant anti-Judaism existed but with little attention given to its curtailment ecclesiastically.  The holocaust and its aftermath convinced many Christians of an ecclesiastical complicity with what happened to the Jews during this horrendous period, and thus during the post-holocaust period many Christian bodies have sought to express in formal papers the relationship of the churches to Judaism.  Is there light at the end of the proverbial tunnel?  To seek answers, we will analyze Biblical and non-Biblical materials, written and artistic, and their impact upon Jewish-Christian Dialogue.

Weinstein-Rosenthal Professor of Jewish and Christian Studies
Old Testament history and thought
American Judaism
Knowing and Choosing in the Face of Adversity and UncertainitySelf; Interdisciplinary; Literature
Mavis Brown
CRN: 25512

There are many lenses through which to analyze the human experience. In this reading-intensive course of challenging texts, we will examine knowing on the one hand, and various ways of choosing in the face uncertainty and adversity on the other, as these concepts play out in selected classic texts. In the second part of the semester, we will examine the ways in which contemporary individuals seek to fashion happy and fulfilling lives, as we shift our focus to a 21st century situation of adversity that demands change.

Associate Professor of Education
Educational policy and school reform
21st century framework for learning
Child and adolescent development/diverse learners
Weaving children's literature into the curriculum
Global awareness: cultural and educational perspectives
Latin American Politics and FilmLatin America; Politics; Democracy
Jennifer Pribble
CRN: 25498

For most of the 20th century, Latin America was characterized by unstable political and economic regimes.  Indeed, in countries as diverse as Argentina and El Salvador, democracy had a difficult time taking root, and repressive authoritarian rule was common.  Latin America also faced significant economic challenges throughout this time period, experimenting with several development models; many of which produced volatile growth, high debt, and severe boom-bust cycles.  By the turn of the 21st century, however, the political-economic landscape of Latin America appeared to have shifted. Beginning in the 1980s, the region began to witness unprecedented democratic stability and by the early 2000s economic growth had begun to pick up steam. Still, the countries in the region continue to face several difficult challenges, including high levels of inequality, organized crime, and citizen discontent. This course will explore the region's turbulent politics, focusing on core concepts from comparative politics, including revolution, dictatorship, democracy, development, and the state. The course will combine both written analysis and film to introduce students to the region and to the field of Political Science.

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Politics and Diplomacy
Latin American Politics
Comparative Political Economy
Comparative Welfare States
Comparative Politics
Political Parties
Lived Religion: Acting Out FaithGender and domestic religion; Material religion; Comtemporary lived religion
Elizabeth Sheehan
CRN: 25762

The course will examine the ways in which people of faith enact their religious beliefs in daily life, both individually and communally. While framing this “lived religion” within institutional religion, the course will consider how lay people and local religious specialists adapt and create doctrine and ritual to meet their needs within particular historical and cultural contexts. Topics addressed will include gender and domestic religion, material religion, religion and the body, totems and taboos, death and mourning, and digital piety. Course readings will focus on contemporary lived religion in the US within Jewish, Protestant, and Catholic communities.

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Liberal Arts
Love and Its ComplicationsPsychology; Philosophy; Self
Ray Hilliard
CRN: 25475

In this seminar we will try to read (or view), discuss, and write about eight written texts and three films (or filmic texts) that deal with the topic of love in divergent ways. The authors of the various texts all assume that love - of one or another type - is central to human happiness, but they also all believe that people typically encounter serious impediments in the search for fulfillment in love. In one of its important meanings, the word "complications" in the title of the seminar refers to such impediments and to the strategies that people use in trying to overcome them. The various texts have been chosen in part not only because each of them presents a distinctive perspective on the seminar topic, but also because they reflect some of the important kinds of writing or film-making that influential thinkers (a philosopher, a founder of modern psychology) and artists (both literary and cinematic) have chosen as means of exploring the topic of love. Which is to say that the texts we'll examine are all quite demanding (their complexities reflect the complexities of the ideas they explore) and are meant to help you become stronger readers and thinkers - college-level readers and thinkers. We'll begin by learning about some of the ideas propounded by two of the most influential theorists of love in the history of Western culture, Plato and Sigmund Freud, and then go on to examine a considerable diversity of literary and cinematic texts--novels, a play, a group of poems, and three films--in which the complexities of love are explored, not at a theoretical level, but at the level of actual human or personal experience.

Professor of English
Eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century British novel
Modern American Human Rights Lawyers: Leadership and Community ServiceLaw; Leadership; Community Service
Jonathan Stubbs
CRN: 25733

Many lawyers become  leaders and serve in roles  ranging   from heads of local civic and religious institutions, to President of the United States.  This course explores the relationship between the law and leadership.  It will challenge students to refine what leadership means to them in theory as well as provide practical experiences for reflection. The specific focal point for such thought and writing will be roles that lawyers have played in addressing social justice issues in America.  The course proceeds on the explicit premise that leadership involves service to others for the common good.

Professor of Law
Race and the Law
Constitutional Law
Human Rights Law
Moral Antecedents of the Global Economic CrisisEconomics; Ethics; Morality
Jonathan Wight
CRN: 25581 and 25582

This course analyzes the Great Recession of 2008-2009 and the role that changing ethical norms may have played in causing the financial market collapse.  We begin by addressing basic concepts from ethics, economics, history and philosophy.  The intellectual backdrop for our work is provided by philosopher/economist Adam Smith.  Here are some of the questions students will pursue:  How do natural instincts combine with humanly-devised institutions to create economic success (or failure)?  Did greed play a role in creating this recession?  Does the invisible hand of the market depend on greed?  Is self-interest virtuous or vicious?  Are human actions always rational?  Can institutional reforms prevent another financial collapse?

Professor of Economics
Professor of International Economics, International Studies Concentration Advisor: International Economics
Ethics of capitalism
Economics of globalization
Adam Smith
Narratives of Identity & RelationshipNarratives of Identity and Relationships
Scott Johnson
CRN: 25444 and 25446

Story plays a central role in creating our senses of identity and relationship. Narratives of various forms help establish who we believe we are, how we see ourselves in relation to others, our personal ideologies, and our behavior in interactions with those around us. Gender, race, social class, ethnicity, ability, friendships, family, sexual identity, profession, religious beliefs...these and countless other aspects of our lives are in many ways given meaning through the narratives in and around us, and they are brought to life in our communication behavior. In this course, we will explore in depth the role of narratives in shaping who we are and how we interact with others.

Associate Provost for Student Academic Initiatives
Associate Professor of Communication Studies
Communication Education
Interpersonal and Group Communication
Communication Theory and Research
Philosophical Backgrounds to the American RevolutionCivil liberties; Political philosophy; Slavery
Del McWhorter
CRN: 25548

This course focuses on 17th and 18th century English and American political thought and action. Issues to be examined include the reshaping of the concept of sovereignty in the absence of a sovereign king in the aftermath of the English Civil War; race and paradox of racism in the US where “all men are created equal”; women’s rights; the concept of autonomy as a criterion for citizenship; and the relation between democracy and capitalism. Readings will include selections from the Levellers, Thomas Hobbes, Thomas Jefferson, John Locke, and others.

The Philosophy of FreedomEthics; Justice; Politics
Javier Hidalgo
CRN: 25484

Is freedom valuable? Why should we care about it? In this course we will examine the nature and value of freedom. We will consider the value of different freedoms, such as freedom of expression and economic freedom, and explore the relationship between freedom and various public policy issues, such as immigration, hate speech, prostitution, drug use, and human enhancement. The readings will be philosophical papers on these topics.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Immigration
Citizenship
Global Leadership
The Pious and the Profane: Monks, Nuns, and Medieval Society and CultureMedieval; Monasticism; History
David Routt
CRN: 25754

The Pious and the Profane explores Christian monasticism from its fourth-century origin in Egypt, Palestine, and Syria through the creation of the Jesuit order in the sixteenth.  It traces how the ascetic practice embraced by individual hermits outside the established church became, in its communal Benedictine form, an integral element of the medieval church.  The course delves into monastic reform (Cluniac, Cistercian), crusading monastic orders (Templars, Hospitallers), mendicant monasticism (Franciscans, Dominicans, Poor Clares), and the depiction of monks and nuns in medieval vernacular literature (e.g., Chaucer, Boccaccio).  The course concludes with the portrayal of medieval monasticism in modern popular culture.

Politics and LiteraturePolitics; Literature; Interdisciplinary
Kevin Cherry
CRN: 25496

The course will encourage students to read well-known works of literature in order to illuminate and broaden the study of political science. What can reading books tell us about the political climate in which a particular author writes? What can they tell us about human desires and motivations that shape political attitudes and decisions but are not easily studied through traditional “social science” methodology? What can novelists and poets tell us about the limitations of political institutions in light of human nature?

St. Petersburg: The Myth and the City in Literature, Painting, and MusicVisual Culture; International Studies; Interdisciplinary
Joe Troncale
CRN: 25474

For Russians, St. Petersburg is much more than just another pretty face.  The city lives and breathes the spirit of what makes them and us who we are since we are ultimately the same.  Exploring the differences between the myth and reality of Petersburg through the arts locates us in the very place where those differences are born and find expression in the metalanguages of literature, music, and painting.  The very process of mythmaking as an alternate reality is where we discover ourselves, our highest aspirations and our darkest fears and, thanks to the Russian genius, the beauty of both.

Associate Professor of Russian
Russian literature
Russian art
Science, Pseudoscience, and Anti-Science: Perspectives for Future LeadersScience:Politics; Leadership
Jack Singal
CRN: 25525

This course will examine how evidence-based reasoning is applied, misapplied, and not applied in the modern world.  Scientific knowledge and advancement underlie every aspect of contemporary life.  Yet in many ways the misunderstanding of science and the acceptance of anti-scientific ideas have never been more prevalent.  We will journey across modern society to explore the issues at the heart of this paradox: 1.  What defines scientific and evidence-based reasoning. 2. How scientific and evidence-based decision making is the foundation of the relataive prosperity , security, and health that we enjoy. 3. What are common contemporary manifestations of pseudoscience and anti-science.   4. Why do pseudoscience and anti-science have the wide appeal and traction that they do.

Assistant Professor of Physics
Multiwavelength astrophysics analysis
Data challenges in large survey astrophysics
Instrumentation methods in visible, radio, and microwave
Seeing, Believing and UnderstandingArt and Art History; Visual Culture; Information Science
Pat Fishe
CRN: 25583

This course explores how we process and interpret what we see, providing an introduction to the methods of effective visual display of information. The course covers the display of quantitative data, information that describes maps of buildings, people, or other things and information that has a motion component or shows action, such as the cloud development, dancing, and sports formations. We will illustrate how effective visual displays allow observers to summarize complex thoughts, make connections between seemingly unrelated phenomena and be persuaded by visual as opposed to verbal or written argument. We will teach students how to organize information for display, how to use an artistic perspective to make displays more effective, and how to recognize misleading presentations of information.

The Patricia A. and George W. Wellde, Jr. Distinguished Chair in Finance
Professor of Finance
Corporate Governance
Federal Reserve
IPO Market
Recession Economics
Securities and Exchange Commission
Stock Market Conditions
The Spirit and Soul of American Economic HistoryEconomics; History; Literature
Erik Craft
CRN: 25579 and 25580

Students will study five important topics in American history from an economic perspective while reading associated classic American novels. Our subjects will include: Late Nineteenth-Century Monetary Policy (gold standard), Immigration, Technology and Regulation, the Great Depression, and Discrimination and Civil Rights. This course would be an especially relevant complement to students taking Principles of Microeconomics or Principles of Macroeconomics.

Associate Professor of Economics and Philosophy, Politics, Economics, and Law (PPEL)
Economic History of the National Weather Service
Sex Ratios
Traffic Citations
Staging Conflict: Opera, Politics and SocietyOpera
Linda Fairtile
CRN: 25745

Opera is more than entertainment. Like works of literature, operas address the concerns of individuals, families, societies, and nations.  They reflect the times in which they were created and the times in which they are performed.  This course approaches opera from a thematic perspective, examining works that address class conflict, political unrest, family dynamics, and gender roles. Through reading, viewing, and discussion, we will explore these themes in their historical contexts and relate them to contemporary experience. Students will learn to decode the language of opera by watching videos and attending live performances. No musical knowledge or experience is required

Head, Parsons Music Library
Adjunct Lecturer of Music
Italian opera
Archives and manuscripts
Storytelling, Identity, and Social ChangeSocial Justice; Theater and Performance Studies; Literature
Terry Dolson
CRN: 25795

This course explores the role that life narratives—“stories”—play in shaping a community’s shared sense of identity and in enacting social change. Using a rhetorical lens to read a variety of life narratives produced at crucible moments in American history, we will consider how distinct storytelling methodologies have been used to inscribe, enforce, and/or upturn specific community norms and identities, and to mobilize or restrict change. Texts will include as-told-to and self-authored narratives, “imposter” narratives, oral histories, stories archived using digital media, and secondary sources on narrative storytelling, narratives and social movements, and community literacy.

Associate Director, Community-Engaged Learning
Taking it to the Streets: Old and New Media in the Education of the Public Media; News Media; History
Dan Roberts
CRN: 25760

Taking it to the Streets will examine a variety of old and new media technologies.  It will review the resources available to public scholars for taking an informative and enlightening message to the general public.  The course will elucidate ways in which the humanities will help students master the traditional tools of research and turn them to their advantage for intergenerational education.  Then working alone or in teams, students will build some multimedia means of information dispersal.  They will craft accessible messages for a non-academic audience and then deliver them as research dossiers and oral presentations.

Program Chair, Liberal Arts
Professor, Liberal Arts
The Families: Italian Organized Crime and Its Fictional RepresentationsFilm; Italian; Crime
Corrado Corradini
CRN: 25453 and 25454

This course is a survey of various fictional representations, in literature and movies, of Italian organized crime. In particular, it intends to call students’ attention to the differences between the representations of mobsters in Italy and the United States. We will focus on the historical and socio-anthropological peculiarities of mafia representations in order to explain these differences as we compare fiction and non-fiction sources.

Assistant Director, Spanish Intensive Language Program
Narratology
Early European narrative and folklore
Literary motifs and symbols
Waiting for God: Belief & Doubt in LiteratureLiterature; Religion; Philosophy
Terryl Givens
CRN: 25471

This course will combine intellectual and social history, philosophy, and literature. Our focus will be on the extended crisis of faith inaugurated in the West by the Enlightenment and its ramifications and reflections in literature over succeeding generations. This syllabus will require us to confront these issues: how does fiction illuminate the unwritten boundaries of acceptable religious diversity? How have reflective writers framed the conflict between faith and doubt, and what solutions have emerged? What is the role of human agency in belief and doubt? Is the religious impulse one that is, ultimately, amenable to social or intellectual control?

Professor of Literature and Religion
Bostwick Professor of English
Romanticism, Literary Theory, Religion and Literature
Water: From Noah's Flood to KatrinaWater; Literature; International
Walid Hamarneh
CRN: 25576

One of the earliest natural forces to face human beings was water. It was a challenge, but more importantly it was the life giver and the life destroyer. Many cultures represented this ambivalent attitude towards water in their myths and literature. Water became through floods the means of destroying the old and giving birth to the new. In our modern times, we still gaze at water with similar ambivalence. We will look at the representations of this complex attitude to water in literature and other cultural forms that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of water.

What Are Universities For?History; American Studies; Humanities
Nicole Sackley
CRN: 25753

This seminar explores the role of the university in American intellectual, cultural, and political life
since the eighteenth century. The course will encourage students to think about the nature and
purpose of higher education; the university’s place in the wider society; and the university as a
social and economic institution. Topics will include the rise of the university and liberal education,
knowledge production and the nation state, academic freedom and student protest, cultural
perceptions of the university, and the university as a site of labor. Authors may include Thomas
Jefferson, John Henry Newman, John Dewey, Clark Kerr, Mario Savio, Wendell Berry, Derek Bok,
and Jane Smiley.

Associate Professor of History and American Studies
Coordinator, American Studies Program
Program Coordinator of Humanities in A&S
United States and the World
U.S. Cultural and Intellectual History
Wrongful Convictions in Modern America- Costs, Causes, and SolutionsInterdisciplinary; History; Law
Mary Tate
CRN: 25746

In the United States, there have been over 240 exonerations achieved through advances n DNA testing capabilities.  Seventeen of those DNA exonerations arose in cases where individuals were sentenced to death.  There is an additional universe of wrongful convictions that involves cases where proof of innocence is not biological in nature.  Such cases pivot around other sources of exculpatory evidence, including recanted testimony, mistaken identification or official misconduct. The production of wrongful convictions is a lens through which society can examine a plethora of important realities.  Race, poverty, faith in science and reason, notions around punishment and redemption and the allocation of scarce resources are all fluidly and dynamically tied to the study of wrongful convictions.

Director, Institute for Actual Innocence
Clinical Professor of Law
Wrongful Convictions
Actual Innocence Commissions
Post-Conviction Remedies
Higher Education: From Aristotle to Animal Househistory of higher education, interdisclipinary, morality

Paul Clikeman
CRN:26401

This course will examine the writings of notable educators from the last 2500 years. Students will examine the evolution of the modern university, controversies over curricular content, competing objectives of liberal arts and vocational education, tensions between religious and secular viewpoints, and the role of extra-curricular activities. 

Associate Professor of Accounting
Auditing
Auditor Independence
Accounting (Financial)
Seeing, Believing, and UnderstandingArt and Art History; Visual Culture; Information Science

Patrick Fishe
CRN:26302

This course explores how we process and interpret what we see, providing an introduction to the methods of effective visual display of information. The course covers the display of quantitative data, information that describes maps of buildings, people, or other things and information that has a motion component or shows action, such as the cloud development, dancing, and sports formations. We will illustrate how effective visual displays allow observers to summarize complex thoughts, make connections between seemingly unrelated phenomena and be persuaded by visual as opposed to verbal or written argument. We will teach students how to organize information for display, how to use an artistic perspective to make displays more effective, and how to recognize misleading presentations of information.

The Patricia A. and George W. Wellde, Jr. Distinguished Chair in Finance
Professor of Finance
Corporate Governance
Federal Reserve
IPO Market
Recession Economics
Securities and Exchange Commission
Stock Market Conditions
Waiting for God: Belief and Doubt in LiteratureBelief; Doubt; Literature

Terry Givens

CRN: 26331

This course will combine intellectual and social history, philosophy, and literature. Our focus will be on the extended crisis of faith inaugurated in the West by the Enlightenment, and its ramifications and reflections in literature over succeeding generations. This syllabus will require us to confront these issues: how does fiction illuminate the unwritten boundaries of acceptable religious diversity? How have reflective writers framed the conflict between faith and doubt, and what solutions have emerged? What is the role of human agency in belief and doubt? Is the religious impulse one that is, ultimately, amenable to social or intellectual control?

Professor of Literature and Religion
Bostwick Professor of English
Romanticism, Literary Theory, Religion and Literature
BioethicsBiology; Ethics; Justice; Medicine

Linda Boland

CRN: 26306 

Stem cell therapy. Human cloning. Genetic testing. Organs for sale. Physician-assisted suicide. Constantly in the news and at the forefront of political, legal, and religious agenda, these phrases are associated with strong emotions and opinions. How do we develop decisions about these critical issues? What information and principles guide ethical decisions in medicine and what are the consequences for humanity? In this seminar, we will study ethical questions in medicine and biomedical research. We will learn to approach   problems in bioethics from a variety of perspectives, guided by ethical principles and centered on an understanding of relevant concepts in human biology and scientific technology.

Associate Professor of Biology
Neuroscience
Molecular Physiology
Ion Channels
Bioethics
Civic Journalism & Social JusticeJournalism; Social Justice

Thomas Mullen

CRN: 26334

This course will explore the various ways that journalism has functioned as an instrument of social justice through identification and publication of issues that include poverty, racism, war, health, religion, education and other related topics. Students will study case histories in which journalists have brought public attention to important social concerns and the ways in which those concerns were resolved to bring about more just communities. Research includes identifying contemporary issues of concern and applying basic journalism training to create awareness of specific social situations. This fall, students will take part in a journalism department project to help produce work related to the Library of Congress Veterans History Project.

Director of Public Affairs Journalism
Summons to ConscienceCivil Rights; Race; African American

Julian Hayter

CRN: 26313

Historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall contended, “…remembrance is always a form of forgetting, and the dominant narrative of the civil rights movement… distorts and suppresses as much as it reveals”. Mid-20th century social movements not only repudiated de jure and de facto segregation, but they also rejected firmly entrenched ideologies (e.g., scientific racism, social Darwinism, etc.) that helped perpetuate dispossession throughout America’s vulnerable communities. As it happened, these social movements instigated a culture of rights that changed the relationship between Americans and the state. This culture of rights also helped bring about legislation that not only protected African Americans, but also America’s women, impoverished, mentally ill, and physical challenged. Yet, we attribute these freedom struggles and the actualization of civil rights legislation to a handful of activists and policymakers. This course utilizes contemporary literature from the mid-20th century and recent historical scholarship to interrogate the essence of civil rights organizational strategies. To that end, this course is designed to examine how Americans became active agents in the promotion of a more inclusive America. We will also study the impact civil rights legislation has had on American life. 

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Modern African American History
American Civil Rights Movement
African American Politics in Richmond, Virginia
American Political Development after 1945
Crime in Fiction and in FilmLiterature; American Film

Abigail Cheever

CRN: 26303

The hard-boiled novel produced some of the twentieth century's most famous movies, spawning a new visual style (film noir) and establishing the gangster and detective film as among the medium’s most celebrated genres. This seminar pairs novels such as   Hammett's The Maltese Falcon, Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice, and Chandler's The Big Sleep, among others, with their subsequent film adaptations and homages to enable an in-depth consideration of the genre of the crime and detective story and concept of film adaptation. Students will read, watch, analyze and research 1) the formal properties that define detective novels and films 2) the literary and film traditions, historical circumstances, and cultural contexts from which these genres emerged, and 3) the differences that emerge when literary texts are translated into the predominantly visual medium of narrative fiction film.

Associate Professor of English
Post World War II American novels and films
Contemporary American literature and culture
Hollywood Film
Crime and Punishment in Russia

David Brandenberger
 CRN:26350

"Crime and Punishment in Russian Fiction and Film” examines the acts of transgression and retribution, two long-standing preoccupations of the Russian intelligentsia. This course specifically investigates how writers, artists and cinematographers have depicted the changing boundaries of propriety and criminality since the early 19th century. An interdisciplinary course, it includes within its historically-informed framework not only short stories and novels, but also poetry, opera and cinema. Important shifts in expression and representation are identified during the emergence of imperial Russian civil society; the 1917 revolution; the Stalin period; late Soviet stagnation; and after the collapse of Communism in 1991.

Professor of History and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Politics and Diplomacy, Modern Europe
Imperial Russia / Soviet Union / Post-Soviet space
Ideology & Propaganda
Nationalism
Interdisciplinary methodology (esp. concerning literature and film)
Rights of the Criminally AccusedPolitical Science; Justice; Law

Jennifer Bowie

CRN:26341

The purpose of this course is to critically examine the substantive and procedural aspects of criminal law through the study of key decisions made by the U.S. Supreme Court. In particular this course will focus on the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eight, and Fourteenth Amendment protections of the criminally accused. Emphasis will be placed on the approaches taken by the U.S. Supreme Court to balance law enforcement’s goals against constitutional protections afforded to individuals. We will study the decisions of the Supreme Court and law enforcement practices with a critical eye in understanding the real world implications each has on the criminal justice system.

Associate Professor of Political Science
Judicial Politics
Constitutional Law
American Politics
Democracy and EducationEducation; Politics; Philosophy

Nathan Snaza

CRN: 26332

This course will investigate the historical, social, political, and philosophical contexts of American schools and debates about school reform. Through readings, discussions, volunteer work in Richmond Public Schools, autobiographical essays, and an individual research project, students will explore the complicated—and even contradictory—relations between schooling and democratic life in the U.S. Readings will begin with essays by “Founding Fathers” Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Rush and conclude with a unit on how the OCCUPY movement (especially in NYC and Chicago) intersected with grassroots activism by parents, students and teachers to resist the increasing corporatization of public schools.

Director, Bridge to Success Program
Modern Narrative, primarily British and American
Literary Theory and Continental Philosophy
Posthumanism
Social and Cultural Foundations of Education, Critical Pedagogy, Literacy Studies
Sexuality and Gender Studies
Devil in the Details: Microhistory and Historical NarrativeDevil; Literature; Religion

Doug Winiarski

CRN: 26340

Witches and heretics, religious prophets and confidence men, Indian captives and murdering mothers, cat massacres and slave conspiracies: these are the subjects of “microhistory,” a distinctive approach to the study of the past that seeks to reveal broader forces of historical change through detailed stories of obscure individuals and seemingly bizarre events. In this seminar, students learn how scholars research and write these gripping historical narratives and work in teams to develop their own microhistories based on rare archival documents from eighteenth-century New England.

Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies
Religion in early America
Native American religions
Religion and popular/material culture
The Power of the Powerless: Literature and Social Change in Eastern EuropeTransnationalism; Social Justice; Literature

Yvonne Howell
CRN:26353

When and how do ordinary people have the power to effect real changes to the system? How can we "live truthfully" in a complicated global economy and ecologically fragile world that seems to demand collusion and moral compromises? This course takes its title from an influential essay by Vaclav Havel, the playwright, rock music fan, and political prisoner who helped bring down the Iron Curtain and become Czechoslovakia's first democratically elected President. Readings include fiction and essays from Eastern Europe as well as a selection of “core” philosophical and political texts.

Professor of Russian and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Modern Europe
Russian literature and culture
Czech literature and culture
Sociobiology in cross-cultural perspective
History of science (Soviet Union)
Education and SocietyEducation; Leadership; Citizenship

Thomas Shields

CRN: 26314

This course will examine the history and role of K-12 education in our American republic. From the vision of Thomas Jefferson for common schools in Virginia to the No Child Left Behind legislation, public (and private) education has been crucial in educating for citizenship, moral character, and for productivity.

Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs
Associate Professor, Education
Program Chair, Graduate Education
School Liaison, AFAC
Member, SPCS Speakers Bureau
Educational Leadership
School & Housing Segregation
Changing Demographics in RVA
Ethics & Leadership
Telling the Past: Epics, Legends, & HIstoryHistory; Literature

Joanna Drell

CRN: 26339

What do fantastical stories of heroes and lovers, travelers and monsters tell us about Antiquity and the Middle Ages? This seminar challenges students to consider the meanings of "history", "fact", "fiction", "literature" when using such texts as Virgil's Aeneid (30-19 B.C.), Beowulf (ca. 8th c. A.D.), The Song of Roland (ca. 12th c.), the lays of Marie de France (ca. late 12th/early 13th c.), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (ca. 14th c), Dante's Inferno (ca. early 14th c), and Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini's The Two Lovers (15th c). A central question will be how historians can use narratives to understand the cultures we study.

Ethics & International AffairsEthics; International Affairs

David Lefkowitz

CRN: 26330

This course will focus on ethical issues raised by war, international economic inequality, and immigration. Among the questions we will discuss are: What makes people morally liable to attack in time of war? What, if anything, justifies so-called collateral damage?  Can terrorism ever be morally justifiable? Are the enormous economic inequalities between states morally justifiable? Is it just to treat as more important the economic wellbeing of our co-nationals or fellow citizens than the economic wellbeing of foreigners? Finally, what if anything justifies states in placing restrictions on immigration? Are there any criteria for restricting immigration that are morally impermissible? 

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law (PPEL)
Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Ethical Theory
Applied Ethics
Knowing and Changing in Face of AdversitySelf; Literature

Mavis Brown

CRN: 26322 and 26323

There are many lenses through which to analyze the human experience. In this seminar we will examine knowing on the one hand, and various ways of choosing in the face of uncertainty on the other as these concepts play out in selected literary texts. Toward the end of the course, we will shift our focus to ways individual human beings go about fashioning their lives that will hopefully lead to human happiness and fulfillment.

Associate Professor of Education
Educational policy and school reform
21st century framework for learning
Child and adolescent development/diverse learners
Weaving children's literature into the curriculum
Global awareness: cultural and educational perspectives
Films of the 40'sFilm; Narrative; History

Walter Schoen
CRN: 26304

The students will be asked to "read" films as cultural relections of the times in which they are created. This "reading" will include analysis of narrative as well as cinemagraphic techniques used in the creation of movies. The course will be driven by the question, "Can a popular medium such as film be a primary source for understanding history?"

Associate Professor of Theatre
Acting
Directing
Shakespeare
Theatre in Russia
Framing the ConstitutionLaw; Legal History

John Pagan

CRN: 26342

This course provides an examination of the making of the United States Constitution, focusing on the political ideas that led to the creation of the American republic; the Constitutional Convention of 1787; the ratification debates, and the adoption of the Bill of   Rights. Through our readings and discussion, we will undertake a critical examination of the lofty ideals and pragmatic compromises that produced the framework of American government.

University Professor Emeritus
Legal History
Constitutional Law
Sexuality and the Law
Games Animals PlayGames; Animals; Play

Michael Kerckhove
CRN: 26036

Game theory studies strategic behavior. For example, a mouse makes food choices. Will the mouse choose to eat what tastes good, is most nutritious, or is least likely to result in confrontations with other mice? What foraging strategies might a mouse adopt to avoid predation? Is there room in a population of mice for several different strategies to coexist, each with high probability for reproductive success? More interestingly, are what appear to us as choices actually hard-wired behaviors that are inherited through natural selection? Students, with guidance from a behavioral ecologist and a mathematician, will explore these questions through a variety of case studies.

Associate Professor of Mathematics
IQS Program Coordinator
Differential Geometry
Global Economic CrisisEconomics; Ethics; Morality

Jonthan Wight
CRN: 26300 and 26301

This course analyzes the Great Recession of 2008-2009 and the role that changing ethical norms may have played in causing the financial market collapse. We begin by addressing basic concepts from ethics, economics, history and philosophy. The intellectual backdrop for our work is provided by philosopher/economist Adam Smith. Here are some of the questions students will pursue: How do natural instincts combine with humanly-devised institutions to create economic success (or failure)?  Did greed play a role in creating this recession? Does the invisible hand of the market depend on greed? Is self-interest virtuous or vicious? Are human actions always rational? Can institutional reforms prevent another financial collapse?

Professor of Economics
Professor of International Economics, International Studies Concentration Advisor: International Economics
Ethics of capitalism
Economics of globalization
Adam Smith
Health Care Politics and Policy Around the WorldHealthcare; Politics

Tracy Roof

CRN:26357

This course is both a first year seminar and one of the Tocqueville seminars focused on studying the U.S. from a comparative or international perspective. The United States has a more limited and targeted welfare state than most other wealthy, industrialized countries and has stood out as the only country among its peers without universal access to health care coverage. This course will look at the differences in health care policy and politics between the U.S. and countries such as Canada, Japan, and those of Western Europe. It will cover the comparative historical development of various health care systems and the relative role of the private sector and the government in providing, paying for, and regulating access to health care. It will also look at how recent health care reforms in the U.S. compare with the policies developed in other countries and how various political forces such as organized labor, doctors’ organizations, and legislative institutions shape policy.

Associate Professor of Political Science
American political institutions
Legislative process
Public policy
Organized labor
Interest groups
Heroes and VillainsHeroes; Villains

Scott Allison
CRN:26362

From both a social science and humanities perspective we will explore the meaning and significance of heroes and villains. We will read Joseph Campbell's Hero With a Thousand Faces, examining the various elements of the hero myth and approaching the study of heroism using a comparative mythological framework. We will analyze Paul Johnson's Heroes: From Alexander the Great to Julius Caesar, focusing on pivotal historical moments and contexts that help shape and define heroes. We will also read excerpts from my book Heroes and Villains: Who They Are, Why We Need Them, which approaches good and evil from a social psychological perspective. The issues we will address will include the social construction of heroes and villains, the types of human motivations that draw us to these figures, and the role that heroes and villains play in shaping society.

Professor of Psychology
Social Psychology
Personality Psychology
Research Methods
Heroes, Great Leaders, Legends, and Martyrs
Entrepreneurship & InnovationInnovation; Drive

Porcher Taylor

CRN: 26347

We’ll ponder several critical thinking-rich questions in our Entrepreneurship and Innovation journey. How do entrepreneurs and innovators with “unceasing drive and incentive to innovate” create breakthrough ideas that meet the test of the marketplace? How do they commercialize revolutionary inventions and innovations? Why is the nation of Israel itself a role model example of a start-up company? Why is economic power dramatically shifting from the producer-in-control to the customer-in-control, and how might that drive   innovation and disrupt virtually every industry? Will 3D-printing usher in the Second Industrial Revolution?

Program Chair, Paralegal Studies
Professor, Paralegal Studies
Associate Professor of Management
Paralegal studies
The Families: Italian Organized Crime and Its Fictional RepresentationsLiterature; Italian Crime

Corrado Corradini

CRN: 26349

The course is a survey of various fictional representations, in literature and movies, of Italian organized crime. In particular, it intends to call students’ attention to the differences between the representations of mobsters in Italy and the United States. We will focus on the historical and socio-anthropological peculiarities of mafia representations in order to explain these differences as we compare fiction and non-fiction sources.

Assistant Director, Spanish Intensive Language Program
Narratology
Early European narrative and folklore
Literary motifs and symbols
Is Jewish-Christian Dialogue Possible?

Frank Eakin
CRN:26351

Anti-Judaism has been a reality for Jews since prior to the emergence of Christianity, but with Christianity a new form of anti-Judaism emerged, i.e., theological anti-Judaism. Through readings and discussions we will seek to understand this phenomenon historically.  The period of the holocaust served as a pivotal change of focus. Prior to the holocaust rampant anti-Judaism existed but with little attention given to its curtailment ecclesiastically. The holocaust and its aftermath convinced many Christians of an ecclesiastical complicity with what happened to the Jews during this horrendous period, and thus during the post-holocaust period many Christian bodies have sought to express in formal papers the relationship of the churches to Judaism. Is there light at the end of the proverbial tunnel? To seek answers, we will analyze Biblical and non-Biblical materials, written and artistic, and their impact upon Jewish-Christian Dialogue.

Weinstein-Rosenthal Professor of Jewish and Christian Studies
Old Testament history and thought
American Judaism
Latin American Politics Through FilmLatin America; Politics; Film

Jennifer Pribble

CRN:26356

For most of the 20th century, Latin America was characterized by unstable political and economic regimes. Indeed, in countries as diverse as Argentina and El Salvador, democracy had a difficult time taking root, and repressive authoritarian rule was common. Latin America also faced significant economic challenges throughout this time period, experimenting with several development models; many of which produced volatile growth, high debt, and severe boom-bust cycles. By the turn of the 21st century, however, the political-economic landscape of Latin America appeared to have shifted. Beginning in the 1980s, the region began to witness unprecedented democratic stability and by the early 2000s economic growth had picked up steam. Still, the countries in the region continue to face several difficult challenges, including high levels of inequality, organized crime, and citizen discontent.  This course will explore the region's turbulent politics, focusing on core concepts from comparative politics, including revolution, dictatorship, democracy, development, and the state. The course will combine both written analysis and film to introduce students to the region and to the field of Political Science.

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies
International Studies Concentration Advisor: Politics and Diplomacy
Latin American Politics
Comparative Political Economy
Comparative Welfare States
Comparative Politics
Political Parties
Telling Richmond's Latino Stories: A Community Documentary ProjectLatinos; Community Engagement

Laura Browder
CRN:26352

In this course, we will be researching how to research and collaboratively create community-based documentary projects. While our readings and viewings will range broadly, we will focus on a specific, fast-growing community—Latinos in Richmond. We will attend readings and panel discussions at community forums, and ultimately conduct a “history harvest” at a Latino cultural center in Richmond, interviewing and collecting “evocative objects” from members of the Latino community. The stories and photographed objects we collect will become an important foundation of an exhibition to be staged at the Valentine, Richmond’s premier history museum.

Tyler and Alice Haynes Professor of American Studies
Women in combat
American autobiography
Women and guns
American Communist Party (Earl Browder)
Civil rights in Richmond
Lost in Translation?Culture; Literature; Film

Kathrin Bower

CRN: 26345

Translation seems to be a straightforward concept, but has many applications and meanings. In this course, we will explore how translation affects the communication of ideas across languages, cultures and time. In the process, we will investigate how translation requires sensitivity to linguistic nuance, social mores, cultural values, historical understanding, political organization and hierarchical power relations. Where are the points of cohesion and collision in cross-cultural and cross-linguistic encounters? What does calculated mistranslation and feigned obtuseness reveal about social values? How are translators/interpreters perceived under conditions of colonization and conflict? What methods can be applied to the process of translation? What are the goals of translation? How can translation generate a greater appreciation for the connections between language, culture and history?

The Nature of MathematicsMath

Bill Ross

CRN: 26307

This course will emphasize writing and arguing mathematics. Contrary to popular misconceptions, mathematics is not about computing but about struggling with abstract mathematical concepts and arguing as to what makes them true. The venue for this will be a selection of fascinating abstract mathematical topics from Greek antiquity to the Millennium problems such as: infinity of the primes, bisecting and trisecting angles, Euler's characterization of polyhedral solids, regular polyhedral solids, Fermat's last theorem, the four and five color problems, set theory, notions of infinity, and Goodstein's theorem.

    We will also discuss questions such as

    (i) Are mathematical concepts invented or do they already exist and we just discover them? 

    (ii) Who has the burden of proof in a mathematical argument, the author or the reader?

    (iii) Are some proofs better than others?

    (iv) Do computer calculations give a satisfying mathematical argument? How do we know the computer was programmed correctly?

    (v) Does mathematics need to be practical?

Since this course emphasizes mathematical writing and arguing, and will not depend on any prior knowledge of calculus or statistics, it will be open to all first-year students.

Professor of Mathematics
Complex analysis
Operator theory
Making Meaningful SpaceComedy; Theatre; Drama

Dorothy Holland

CRN: 26326

In this seminar, we will explore the different ways that we experience, imagine and represent physical space both in the theatre and in the world around us. We will consider how the configuration of space influences our thinking, our behaviors and our feelings.  Why do we tend to gravitate to certain locations in our houses, our workplaces and public spaces?  In what ways does the configuration of space seem to curtail our movements and control our behaviors? In what ways does it invite play? In what ways does it convey a sense of welcome or a sense of exclusion? In what ways is our sense of identity linked to specific locations?  What can space and place ‘mean’?  What stories does it tell?  In what ways do the geometries of space have the power to touch the human heart?  

Associate Professor of Theatre and WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Advisory Board Member
Theatre history
Directing
Acting
Gender studies
Medicine and Health in AnthropologyMedicine; Anthropology; Health

Jennifer Nourse

CRN: 26316 and 26328

This is a seminar in medical anthropology. The seminar examines how people in cultures from around the world regard and heal illness. While Western biomedicine is acknowledged throughout the world as effective, in some cases, people turn to traditional or ethnomedical cures. How people articulate their selections in these medically plural environments raises a host of questions we will explore throughout the semester: How do people discuss their illnesses? Do they use metaphors (“I’m fighting a cold")? What is their process of healing? Our readings will conclude with consideration of healing efficacy, spiritual healing and pharmaceutical testing of herbal curing.

Associate Professor of Anthropology
Islamic Medicine
Traditional Medicine and Biomedicine in Southeast Asia and Beyond
Mothering, Midwifery and Ethnic Identity in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Political Autonomy and Ethnic Identity in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Narratives of Identity and RelationshipIdentity; Sociology; Media & Communication

Scott Johnson

CRN: 26319

Story plays a central role in creating our senses of identity and relationship. Narratives of various forms help establish who we believe we are, how we see ourselves in relation to others, our personal ideologies, and our behavior in interactions with those around us. Gender, race, social class, ethnicity, ability, friendships, family, sexual identity, profession, religious beliefs…these and countless other aspects of our lives are in many ways given meaning through the narratives in and around us, and they are brought to life in our communication behavior. In this course, we will explore in depth the role of narratives in shaping who we are and how we interact with others.

Associate Provost for Student Academic Initiatives
Associate Professor of Communication Studies
Communication Education
Interpersonal and Group Communication
Communication Theory and Research
Noble Beasts: Animals in Life and LiteratureLiterature; Animal Studies; English

Joyce MacAllister

CRN: 26336

Our relationship with animals has been both varied and long-standing. Indeed, for centuries, animals have served us as companions, servants, entertainers, and prey. Only recently, however, have scholars representing a variety of disciplines begun to pool their   resources to extend our knowledge of the emotional and rational capacities of animals. Many are arguing, moreover, that this knowledge has significant implications for our own behavior. James Serpell is one of these. A faculty member at U. Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine, Serpell encourages us to consider both the contributions animals have made to our lives and the problems and responsibilities these experiences have incurred. In keeping with his charge, we will explore accounts from history, literature, and   contemporary research regarding the ways animals have improved our lives (e.g. in protecting us, in providing models of communal interaction, in serving as sources of comfort, and in providing recreation and entertainment).  In dealing with the problems of these relationships, we will explore such contemporary conflicts as those between defenders of "animal rights" and proponents of "animal welfare." We will also examine issues relating to the care and sustenance of animals, particularly with reference to advances in veterinary technology and medicine.

Associate Professor of English
History & Biography
Rhetoric & Composition
The Philosophy of FreedomEthics; Justice; Politics

Javier Hidalgo

CRN: 26315

Is freedom valuable? Why should we care about it? In this course, we will examine the nature and value of freedom. We will consider the value of different freedoms, such as freedom of expression and economic freedom, and explore the relationship between freedom and various public policy issues, such as immigration, hate speech, prostitution, drug use, and human enhancement. The readings will be philosophical papers on these topics.

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies
Immigration
Citizenship
Global Leadership
The Postwar American Campus: Progress, Expansion, and ProtestCampuses; Postwar; Progress

Jeannine Keefer
CRN: 26393

This course will explore the changes made to the campus built environment resulting from the GI Bill, the Cold War, shifts in curriculum, as well as advances in construction methods/technology and style. We will look at rural, suburban, and urban campuses focusing on their plans, building programs, specific designs, and the role they played in shaping the identity of the institution and engagement with the surrounding community. Special focus will be given to the regions in and around Philadelphia and Richmond as locations where all three types of campuses exist. 

Visual Resources Librarian
Power & Prejudice of Language

Elizabeth Kissling

CRN: 26346

Why do certain accents sound good or bad? Who decides what is “proper” English? Why do we change our speech style? Students will learn that our views about accent are linguistically arbitrary. Students will expose language prejudices in the world around them, starting with television and film. Next, they will explore the construction of “standard” language and debunk popular notions about “African American English” and “Spanglish.” They will learn about educational practices that either support or disenfranchise speakers of nonstandard varieties. Finally, students will learn about how linguistic style constructs identity and shapes social interaction. They will analyze their own speech and discover their prejudices about language.

Assistant Professor of Spanish and Applied Linguistics
Second language acquisition
Language teaching methods
Phonetics and pronunciation instruction
Spanish in the US
The Search for the SelfLiterature; Interdisciplinary

Marcia Whitehead

CRN:26354

The course will explore various avenues for finding or creating an identity as expressed in texts representing several literary genres, including novels, poems, memoirs, short stories, and philosophical works. Students will analyze and discuss texts from a wide range of cultural settings and will be asked to look beyond their assumptions of personal autonomy or "nature/nurture" dichotomies. Texts are likely to include most of the following: Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart; Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions; Rich, Adrienne Rich's Poetry and Prose; Augustine,Confessions; Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat; Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents; Beauvoir, The Second Sex; Sophocles, Oedipus Rex; Borges, Labyrinths. 

Humanities Librarian
Social Utopias Past and PresentHistoria; Utopia

Sydney Watts

CRN: 26327

How do you imagine what you consider a *better* place, where everyone lives together in harmony? What does this society look like and how does it operate? How do you know your vision for a better world will succeed? This course explores the idea of utopia and how it has been put into practice among several “intentional communities” in Europe and the United States. We will read and discuss examples of utopian literature, conduct primary research on utopian communities of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and write intensively about these topics. The class will also visit and learn from local communities that strive to make the world a better place.

Associate Professor of History and WGSS
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Advisory Board Member
Early Modern Europe
18th Century France
Storytelling, Identity, and Social ChangeStorytelling; Oral Histories

Sylvia Gale
CRN:26354

This course explores the role that life narratives—“stories”—play in shaping a community’s shared sense of identity and in enacting social change. Using a rhetorical lens to read a variety of life narratives produced at crucible moments in American history, we will consider how distinct storytelling methodologies have been used to inscribe, enforce, and/or upturn specific community norms and identities, and to mobilize or restrict change. Texts will include as-told-to and self-authored narratives, “imposter” narratives, oral histories, stories archived using digital media, and secondary sources on narrative storytelling, narratives and social movements, and community literacy.

Director, Bonner Center for Civic Engagement
Taking It To The StreetsMedia; News Media; History

Dan Roberts

CRN: 26337 and 26338

Taking It To The Streets will examine a variety of old and new media technologies. It will review the resources available to public scholars for taking an informative and enlightening message to the general public. The course will elucidate ways in which the humanities will help students master the traditional tools of research and turn them to their advantage for intergenerational education. Then working alone or in teams, students will build some multimedia means of information dispersal. They will craft accessible messages for a non-academic audience and then deliver them as research dossiers and oral presentations.

Program Chair, Liberal Arts
Professor, Liberal Arts
What is Time?Music; Time; Literature

Jessie Fillerup

CRN: 26333

Have you ever wondered why time sometimes seems crawls when waiting for a class to end? Or why it seems to stand still during an important moment, even while your watch is ticking? Have you ever had a memory that unexpectedly intruded on the present, fracturing your sense of continuity? This course explores the nature of time by studying musical works in conjunction with literary, philosophical, and scientific texts.

Associate Professor of Musicology
Tolkien and the Medieval ImaginationLiterature; Epic

G. Scott Davis

CRN: 26343

This course undertakes a reading of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings in light of the medieval texts Tolkien worked on, including Beowulf, the Ancrene Wisse, and the Gawain Poet, as well as some of Tolkien's biographical and critical writings.

Lewis T. Booker Professorship in Religion & Ethics
Professor of Religious Studies and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law (PPEL)
Ethics
Western Religious Thought
Transatlantic Literary Crossings: Spain and the United States in the 19th CenturyLiterature; Spain-United States

Angel Otero-Blanco

CRN: 26344 and 26348

A comparative literature course focusing on nineteenth-century literary tendencies in Spain and the United States. Readings --drawn from romantic, realist, and naturalist traditions -- will include the work of Cadalso, Becquer, Poe, Howells, Perez Galdes, Crane, and Pardo Baxen, among others.

Associate Professor of Spanish
Chair, Department of Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Studies
Nineteenth-century Spanish Literature
War Rhetoric war

Paul Achter
CRN: 26392

War requires the expenditure of many resources. Whether human and physical, financial, political, or moral, war’s costs call for any state that would wage one to define it, to explain its benefits, and to justify it to citizens. In this class, you will learn to be scholarly critics of war rhetoric in the many forms it takes, including the symbolic work of government actors, media personalities, writers, TV producers, photojournalists, news networks, or protestors. We seek to draw informed conclusions about how American-led wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, and elsewhere have been constituted, defended, and maintained.

Associate Professor of Rhetoric
Rhetorical Theory and Rhetorical Criticism
Rhetoric and Racism
Television
American Political Culture
War Rhetoric
Working: An Examination of Legal, Economic and Social Aspects of the Nine to Five WorldLaw; Economics; Work

Steve Allred
CRN: 25444 and 25446

This seminar explores the world of work in modern America, using a variety of sources ranging from U.S. Supreme Court opinions to first-person narratives. We will consider workplace questions of rights, social justice, motivation, challenges, social behavior, and economic necessity. Topics include legal foundations of the employment relationship, how that relationship has been modified by the courts and Congress, the broad spectrum of employment situations in which people of all ages perform their work, the dynamics and perils of the work environment, and how the working world has been portrayed by outside observers and employees.

University Professor
Employment Law
Wrongful Convictions in Modern America: Costs, Causes, and SolutionsLaw; History

Mary Kelly Tate

CRN:26355

 In the United States, there have been over 240 exonerations achieved through advances in DNA testing capabilities. Seventeen of those DNA exonerations arose in cases where individuals were sentenced to death. There is an additional universe of wrongful convictions that involves cases where proof of innocence is not biological in nature. Such cases pivot around other sources of exculpatory evidence, including recanted testimony, mistaken identification or official misconduct. The production of wrongful convictions is a lens through which society can examine a plethora of important realities. Race, poverty, faith in science and reason, notions around punishment and redemption and the allocation of scarce resources are all fluidly and dynamically tied to the study of wrongful convictions. 

Director, Institute for Actual Innocence
Clinical Professor of Law
Wrongful Convictions
Actual Innocence Commissions
Post-Conviction Remedies